I'm no longer living in sin.

For better or for worse, my days as a bachelor are numbered.

After 13 years together, Linda and I finally decided to tie the knot.

Rather than make it a big to-do, we chose to keep things relatively low-key.

Like a bunch of Renegades in the Night, we opted to be joined together in holy matrimony by a local justice of the peace.

Right after the ceremony, we immediately hightailed it over to my mom, and then her mom, so that they could have a moment to share in our big day.

Our honeymoon consisted of a delicious dinner at one of our favorite restaurants in the Poconos, followed by a trip to the casino.

No frills, wedding reception, or grand-scale trip were necessary for this dynamic duo to achieve satisfaction.

For on this day, we were a modern-day Romeo and Juliet, bulletproof and ready to face any challenge head-on.

In the eyes of many - especially those with more traditional values - the tactics by which we employed may be questionable.

Don't get the wrong impression: We take very seriously the sanctity of marriage and all that is required to adhere to its standards.

But, to say that we took the unconventional route to marriage would absolutely be a fair assessment.

For starters, we were engaged for over five years, and bought a home together, before we did the deed.

By my count, it only took us 4,796 days, or 115,104 hours and change to make our relationship "official".

We've often scoffed at the notion that couples aren't considered to be legitimate until they actually exchange their vows.

For our money, we've always lived the same lifestyle as any committed married couple, and then some.

Right from the start, our thought process was that it was wise to get to know each other, rather than rush into things and live to regret our decision later.

In the days after we got married, I've been asked countless times whether I felt any differently.

Aside from the shiny rings that we now sport and a few signatures on the dotted line, my response has always been that I do not.

Perhaps that's because we still adhere to certain routines we established way back when we met during the Clinton Administration.

Though we certainly enjoy many more pleasantries now than we did in the past, by-and-large, our core values haven't changed one iota.

At the end of the day, I still loathe liver and turkey, and she still detests scallops and oysters.

And perhaps most important of all, we're still the same people now as we were then.

Married, or living in sin.