Mahoning Township supervisors learned their new police car has some bugs that need to be worked out according to Township Officer Amie Barclay.

She reported to them during Monday night's meeting that the vehicle currently is unable to be driven at night due to problems with the head lamps being aligned properly. She also reported a problem with the mike holder on the radio and a possible leak in the manifold.

"Someone should get in touch with Milham to get this dealt with," said Chairperson John Wieczorek to Barclay. She told him that Chief Kenneth Barnes instructed her to call the dealer the next day and get the problems remedied.

Supervisor George Stawnyczyj suggested the lights and the radio issues may have been problems introduced when Kovatch's was outfitting the car.

"I think we should start there to get those issues resolved."

Barclay said she would do as the chief instructed and take care of the car. She was also going to check with Milham to see if a more local Ford dealer could handle the manifold issue.

During the committee reports, Wieczorek asked how the new scheduling in the police department was working. A month or so before, the supervisors requested the chief try some of the scheduling solutions developed through mutual agreement with officer Audie Mertz.

"I'm sorry to say the scheduling which initially was running smoothly has been scrapped by the chief and we are back in the bad situation we started in," said committee member Linda Benner.

"The chief was in on the weekend, " said Supervisor Travis Steigerwalt.

"Yes, he was in here to cover a space in the schedule," Benner commented.

As the officials covered their portion of the meeting, Wieczorek mentioned the need for an executive session to cover some personnel and litigation matters. Supervisor Frank Ruch responded by saying, "Look, I will stay and talk about the road crew, but if the discussion is going to be about the police chief or the suit he filed against me, I refuse to discuss it and will be leaving the meeting."

Wieczorek also reported a phone call was received by the township from the Department of Labor and Industry Boiler Division about a complaint filed by Police Chief Kenneth Barnes against the township alleging the fuel pumps at the rear of the building are a hazard.

Steigerwalt asked Wieczorek if he remembered when they were first elected, he asked about whether the tanks were safe and they determined that it would cost over $35,000 four years ago to replace them.

"You may want to see if COSTARS has implemented a fuel program in Carbon County," said Stawnyczyj who suggested that might be an alternative to replacing the tanks if that is the remedy required after L&I's visit on Dec. 20.

Ruch said he wasn't keen on having the grader driven into town to get its tank filled, but Stawnyczyj countered by saying this could be avoided by having a transfer tank installed in the truck to transport the fuel.