A resolution was passed by Washington Township supervisors at the Jan. 5 meeting to revise sewer rates. The Lehigh County Authority requested the change be made to bring rates in line with other areas.

Sewer district 2 will pay $165 per quarter and sewer district 1 will pay $4.80 per thousand gallons. The two are approximately equal.

Resident Ed Ziegler asked who established rates. Solicitor John Ashley said it was done by the LCA.

Supervisor Josh Friebolin was named as the representative to the multi municipal comprehensive plan for the Northern Region of Lehigh County. Supervisor Gerald Phillips will be the alternate.

An ordinance will be advertised to set the street light and fire hydrant assessments at a flat rate so all users share the costs. For 2010 the assessments are $40.80 for lights and $31.22 for hydrants.

Justin Yaich, zoning officer, said a new fee schedule for the subdivision and land development ordinance will require an escrow account be set up. When it is within 10 percent of depletion it has to be reestablished within 15 days. This is to prevent the township from bearing the costs when a developer moves on and does not continue his plan.

Ziegler said he attended a North Whitehall meeting and found all street signs must be reflective by 2012. 3-M company was reimbursing part of the cost. He suggested supervisors check into it.

Friebolin said former supervisor Abe Ahner had requested consideration for a job with the township at the end-of-year meeting. Due to budget constraints, the request is being turned down.

Friebolin said openings will be advertised, and Yaich said some people may not have seen advertisements because they are now in the TIMES NEWS rather than the Call. Ziegler asked if they were posted on the bulletin board in the office and Secretary JoAnn Ahner said they will be in the future.

Resident Kenneth Kibler said he reads both papers and never saw an opening advertised.

Lynn Horne said there are frequent accidents at the Best Station Hotel. He asked if supervisors could contact PennDOT and perhaps get better warning signs. Ashley said a "stop sign ahead" may make it safer.