When something cool happens or someone says something you think you should remember, do you write it down?

I recently bought a journal to record "Homespun Special Moments." I've already jotted down a couple, including this one.

A couple of weekends ago, my niece Abby stayed with us while her parents went away for an anniversary weekend.

Abby's 13 and it's difficult to get her to talk about anything. So after a few attempts at conversation as we were driving in the car on our way to an assignment I was covering, we slipped into a comfortable silence. I was listening to the radio, she was glued to her phone screen. We had a nice time at the Ross Twp. Community Day, got back in the car, talked a little bit about the neat pumpkin carving demonstration we saw and was back to that comfortable silence thing as we headed for home. Then out of the clear blue sky she said, "I love being at your house. I always feel warm and cozy there."

Ahhh. So sweet.

After supper, I gave her the choice of going to the movies or staying home and making biscotti. She opted for the biscotti making. She asked if I still had the apron that her mom had given me years ago with a picture of the her three kids, Abby being only a baby. I now use it as my painting apron but she wanted to wear it, paint smears and all. She pulled out her cell phone and snapped pictures of the apron.

I turned on classic instrumental music. I told her it's my baking music because it soothes and calms me. She raised no objections.

I put the dough on the island surface and tore it in half so she'd have her own. We started adding the chopped dried cranberries, dried cherries and almonds. Out came her phone. I was about to scold her and tell her to put it away when I realized she was taking pictures of the dough. We worked all the dried fruit and almonds in the dough. More pictures. We formed the dough into logs. More pictures. She told me she was sending them to her friends. I think she was proud of her accomplishment.

As we waited for them to bake, I taught her how to play solitaire so I could teach her to play the card game Pounce.

Later we munched on still warm biscotti. It was her first taste of the delicacy.

"Awesome!" was her comment.

As she left to go home Sunday night, she came and gave me a hug and a kiss and said, "Thank you for my weekend. I had a great time."

I'd like to think it was her way of telling me, we made a memory.

***

My friend Connie has two adorable granddaughters. Each time I see her, she usually has some cute stories to share. On Saturday she shared this one.

Her daughter Lindsey was preparing lunch for Gracie, 3 and Lily, 1. Gracie wanted to finger-paint but Lindsey told her, "Mommy's making lunch right now and I can't do two things at one time. Why don't you get your markers and draw some pictures for me?" As Gracie was struggling to climb up the stool at the kitchen island she said, "Mommy, can you get my markers? I can't do two things at one time."

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Jenny Potter says years ago they were in Wal-Mart with her then 3-year-old son. He was being very good so they told him that he could pick out a treat. He instantly went for a candy dispenser shaped as a telephone. While in line for check out there was another small child with her grandmother in line. Her son opened up the flip phone, held it to his ear, then looked at the other cute little blonde girl and with all seriousness said, "Call me."

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A little girl said she was done with school. She knew everything she needed to know. So her mom asked her what the capital of Kentucky was. She thought for a minute and then she said the capital of Kentucky was a K. (Yup. Give that kid a diploma.)

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A three-year-old boy told his mom that his daddy knew what their four new baby kittens were because his daddy picked them up and looked underneath. "I think it's printed on the bottom," he said.

***

A mom told her 3-year-old that he had his shoes on the wrong feet. He was very upset and said, "Don't kid me, Mom, I know they're my feet."

***

Jushua Baker said her four-year-old nephew loves parties. His preschool teacher reminded him there were no parties one day. His response was, "But EVERYDAY is a party!"

I hope that little guy will remember that someday when his mortgage, car payment and electric bill are all due on the same day!

The point is, our kids and grandkids do and say things that we should write down or record for posterity. If your mind is like mine, I can't remember what I ate yesterday, let alone remember something that happened or was said 10-20 years ago. When Becky talks about a childhood memory and I tell her I don't remember that, she says, "Geeze Mom, was I adopted? Were you on drugs?"

Hey! She's got her memories, I've got mine. Like the time she threw herself down in the mall, kicking and screaming and I walked away from her in embarrassment. Or the time...ah, excuse me. I think I'd better go write these down.