Southern rock came North on Saturday night.

Molly Hatchet, one of the few remaining of the original Southern rock bands from the 70s and 80s, played at Penn's Peak and what a reception they got!

They responded the their following with a loud, invigorating asortment of tunes from the past as well as songs from their newest album, "Justice."

"It doesn't get any better than this," said Chris Hornick of Lebanon who said he as been a Hatchet fan for many years. "I've been to every concert here."

This is about the fourth time Molly Hatchet has played at Penn's Peak.

Band leader Bobby Ingram gratefully announced, "This is the largest crowd ever for a Molly Hatchet show at Penn's Peak."

Opening was Blackfoot, which also boasted of its fourth appearance at the venue.

The concert by Molly Hatchet was the third of three days which featured rock and roll for the concert hall.

Last Thursday night, a band from Ireland, Thin Lizzy, took the stage.

Friday night, it was rock music from the 80s with Slaughter and three opening bands combining for over three hours of entertainment.

This week, there again will be three nights of concerts at Penn's Peak. They are:

Ÿ Yes will be at the venue Wednesday night at 8 p.m. Tickets are $50 and $45.

Ÿ On Friday night, country superstar Randy Travis returns. Opening will be Nicole Donatone. The event starts at 8 p.m. Tickets are $44 and $39.

Ÿ Saturday, there's more rock when Live Wire (World's Ultimate AC/DC Tribute) with special guest Guest Beautiful Day (U2 Tribute) perform. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 on the day of the concert.

Hatchet opened their 14-song set with "Whiskey Man" from their 1979 "Flirtin' With Disaster" album.

The band went on to sing songs about justice, darkness, dreams, and Heaven, before ending on a curtain call with their signature "Flirtin' With Disaster."

"We just released the 18th Molly Hatchet album," announced Ingram, referring to "Justice." He brought on stage a large American flag with the POW/MIA symbol in the center.

He told the gathering, many of them obviously Vietnam veterans, "This song is dedicated to the men and women who fight for us. We're here for a rock n' roll show and they're in Afghanistan."

Ingram added that the song is also about getting a raw deal, such as those POWs and Vietnam veterans got. The crowd responded with thunderous verification.

"It's time for madness," he said as the band went into the music and lyrics of "Justice."

An attention-getting element on stage was the blowing, long blonde hair of drummer Shawn Beamer. Throughout the performance, the hair waved like ribbon strands on a fan.

Among the band members, too, is original band member, guitarist Dave Hlubek.

Blackfoot opened with a 90 minute set, which featured such hits as "Train, Train," which had the audience singing along; "Turning Left on a Red Light," and "Too Hard to Handle."

After the concert, members sat in the back of the Penn's Peak auditorium, signing autographs and conversing with their fans.