I have always been a planner and a saver.

Being raised on rather modest means, I learned at a very young age the value of a dollar, how to stretch it, and the importance of saving for a rainy day, of which I have had many throughout my life.

I was taught the difference between want and need and have lived that way as long as I can remember.

I have endured the jokes by my children of being cheap, along with the guilt trips about how their friends have all of the coolest and latest gadgets and clothing styles, while they "suffered" without.

On the flip side, I think that I have always been quick to help out others in need, never even giving it a second thought and truth be told, my kids didn't have it as bad as they would claim.

The fact remains, however, that I have a real hard time shelling out our hard earned cash for things that I deem frivolous and especially when it comes to spending money on myself.

However, like most of us, I have a bucket list.

Some of the items on that list are based on achievement or action alone.

Others, require the expenditure of money, which is why most of my list has remained in the bucket all these years.

It would be real easy to resolve this issue had I been born into money, hit the lottery or become a brain surgeon; but that is not my reality, and so, living modestly and within our means while keeping that rainy day mindset is how we roll.

Roughly a week ago I saw an advertisement that there were a few spots left for a group tour to Scotland the country of my ancestors and one of the places on my bucket list.

I thought about how exciting it would be to go there and allowed myself to dream about it as I reviewed the itinerary.

The thought of being able to photograph all of the beautiful and historical sites there (along with the prospect of seeing many handsome men in kilts) made my heart race and gave me a little feeling of euphoria.

I called hubby on the phone and told him about the wonderful trip.

Being as laid back and eager to please me as he always is, he quickly responded with, "Let's do it."

As thrilled as I was that he said "yes," my heart immediately sank and I was abruptly thrust back into reality when I looked at the cost.

It wasn't really all that bad, I guess, but with my rainy-day mindset, it was foolish and reckless and an idea that was going straight back into the bucket as far as I was concerned.

It would seem that I had rubbed off on my dear hubby over the years because the next day, he informed me of his second thoughts based on the present economy.

Back and forth we went and the whole thing was beginning to stress me out.

"Who needs a bucket list anyway," I thought to myself.

A few days later, and on the last possible day to make the reservations for the trip, my dear hubby called me up at work and spoke the most romantic words into my ear that I have heard in a long time:

"I've been thinking. We work hard and you only live once, so book it."

I immediately went to my email to fill out the form and send it out.

I had to do it quickly before logic and reason stopped me from realizing a dream.

My husband was right.

I have worked very hard since I was 16 years old.

I have always been conservative and very responsible and even in the worst financial times, I have always paid my bills I've earned this, right?

Sometimes, I think it's OK to be a little reckless and feed into your dreams if you can.

What good is a pot of gold if you don't dip into it every now and again?

As for rainy days, well I hear Scotland has plenty of them.

Now it's off to Cabela's to fetch me a snazzy rain coat to wear while experiencing a dream.

Sláinte!