If you didn't like the weather today, you'll hate Tuesday.

The weather cycle began this weekend with record low temperatures.

This morning, the mercury was over 50 in some locations, with heavy rain and even lightning.

Tonight, temperatures again will plummet to an expected sub-zero mark. Tuesday, the National Weather Service says it will be "extremely dangerously cold" with wind chills 20 to 30 below zero.

Tuesday night, sub-zero temperatures again.

By the weekend, we'll be seeing a January thaw with readings of 45 degrees or more.

In between, a little snow is possible Thursday.

This past Friday night, the temperature hit minus 9 degrees in Mount Pocono, breaking a 100-year record. It was minus 7 in 1904.

A record was broken in Allentown on Sunday, hitting 1 degree at 6 a.m. This broke the record of 2 set in 1970.

Havoc on the road

With the falling temps, roads froze and numerous crashes occurred.

Mahoning Township Police Officer-in-Charge Audie Mertz said his department investigated three crashes Friday.

As temperatures rose gradually Sunday, freezing rain created slick roads.

More crashes were reported. Tow truck driver Brian Gomber of Lehighton said Schleicher's Towing responded to two dozen calls for weather-related crashes this weekend.

Sunday morning, a car struck a pole along Route 54 near Dock Street in Nesquehoning. No injuries were reported but the pole was snapped and had to be replaced. Fire police directed traffic for several hours at the scene of the incident.

At 4 p.m., Kidder Township Police reported that Route 534 was "very icy."

At around the same time, a crash with injuries was reported on Route 309 in West Penn Township.

About 3 p.m., a car rolled over on its side on Forest Inn Road. No injuries were reported.

A jackknifed tractor-trailer had the New Columbus hill in Nesquehoning closed at about 7 p.m. Nesquehoning police were assisted at the scene by fire police.

Earlier, there was an incident at the Route 93 truck runoff in Nesquehoning, which resulted in response by Nesquehoning police, Nesquehoning Fire Company No. 1, and fire police.

A car rolled over and entrapment was reported in Banks Township. Two people were injured.

The warm-up

When most people went to bed, it was a slippery mess with road crews working round-the-clock to clean up roads.

When they awoke to go to work, temperatures rose considerably and heavy rain was falling. By 5:30 a.m. the temperature had hit 50 degrees.

Lisa Hiles of Summit Hill reported seeing lightning early this morning.

Roads were still slick, and dense fog rolled in, causing Carbon County school districts, the Tamaqua Area School District, Northern Lehigh, and Northwestern to delay the start of classes for two hours.

Pleasant Valley was the only local school district which didn't have a delay.

A power outage was reported in Lake Hauto where a tree branch fell on a wire.

Back to the Artic

On its website, the National Weather Service is warning, in all capital letters, of "EXTREMELY DANGEROUS AND COLD" conditions on Tuesday, with a high reaching only 4 degrees above zero. The 20-25 mph winds (gusts as high as 40 mph) will bring wind chills to as low as 30 below.

More work for plumbers and fuel oil companies, who were busy over the weekend.

Hiles, who owns Hiles Brothers Plumbing, Heating, and Fuel Oil Company with her husband, David, said they responded to nine calls and helped many others without charge solve their own situations.

"We had five people with frozen, busted pipes and four with frozen oil tanks," she said.

The frozen oil tanks are units which are outside or in unheated areas. The area which freezes is the line leading from the tank.

"We got an amazing amount of calls," she said. "For a lot of them we gave advice for them to help themselves. Most were able to resolve the problem."

One family didn't realize their programmable thermostat had a dead battery. As a result, pipes froze and broke in their home. The family was able to stay with relatives until the situation is repaired today.

Hiles advised callers to put heat in the area where pipes are in unheated areas, open cabinet doors where pipes go through to let the pipes be exposed to heat, and use space heaters in areas where pipes go up exterior walls.

She knows they'll be busy Tuesday.

"Today, all our regularly scheduled stuff was set aside because we know people can't go without heat," she said.