When we grow older we start seeing correlations between things.

For instance, I never realized the full extent of which weather has an impact on how we feel.

Of course, the simple term 'seasonal allergies' hints at the relationship between weather and our health.

Another example is that some say our sinus problems really kick in when low-pressure fronts arrive.

There's some kind of correlation between barometric pressure and sinuses.

Lately people have been complaining of flu, infections, bronchitis, colds and respiratory illness.

I'm part of the group. I didn't catch the flu, but sinus headaches have been particularly annoying.

I realize there's no use complaining because everyone else has been just as sick or sicker.

And in my case, I think the weather was the culprit. Or maybe it was the darn meteors. I was beginning to think I'd been hit on the head by one of those flying rocks.

As you already know, this was a bad week for asteroids and meteors. One whizzed past us Friday.

Another skipped over to Russia where it exploded and broke windows.

Space rocks have been hopping across the atmosphere in one big, strange trajectory. Like skipping stones across a pond.

So I'm figuring that a piece of one of the asteroids hit me on the head and gave me a whopper of a headache.

Or more likely, maybe the flying rocks did something to the atmosphere and my sinuses were affected by it. I do know that my headache was a doozie and it came on the same day as rocks from outer space.

So maybe there's a lesson to be learned. Nothing ruins your week more than an errant asteroid. It can give you a headache and a day when everything goes wrong. Thank goodness asteroids don't boomerang. Or do they?

Maybe the weirdest part of it all is that the weathermen tried to tell us there was no connection between the asteroid and the meteors falling on the same day.

But I don't believe it. That's like saying there's no connection between an erupting volcano and the magma below the earth's crust. I'm always ready for a good conspiracy theory from outer space and have learned to be suspicous about things.

Here's the take-away lesson: If headaches should happen to you during the next meteor storm or asteroid event, don't bother going to your local pharmacy to ask for a treatment.

I already did that. jokingly. There's no over-the-counter medicine available for meteor headaches.

The pharmacist said I'm the first person to ask. She looked at me as if I were from Mars. Then she disappeared behind the counter. She vanished faster than an asteroid.

I concluded that a meteor headache rightfully should be called in to NASA.

But doing so won't help. NASA would probably refer me to ObamaCare, a health plan that doesn't cover meteor sickness.

Those of us who suffer from meteor headaches are getting a run-around.

In the end, I figured I need to get away. Time for a vacation. Peace and quiet, and a few days without hassles.

So I'm thinking of booking a Carnival Cruise. What could possibly go wrong there?