"Remember Me" is memorable.

Robert Pattison, an executive producer of the film, eclipses his "Twlight" fame, proving his acting prowess is deeper than pancake white facial makeup.

Pattison is one reason to remember to see "Remember Me," an emotionally-charged drama with a surprising make that shocking beginning and ending. We won't play spoiler here.

Tyler (Pattison) is an aimless college-age student estranged from his Wall Street executive father (a fine Pierce Brosnan) and still mourning the death of his brother.

He's a help to his mother (Lena Olin) and a caring big brother to his little sister, Caroline (delightful Ruby Jerins), an 11-year-old student at a private school. He and his sister like to hang out at the Alice in Wonderland sculpture in New York City's Central Park.

His room-mate (Tate Ellington) urges him to introduce himself to Ally (Emile de Ravin), a New York University student. She and her policeman father (always solid Chris Cooper) are still coping with the loss of her mother. Ally and Tyler bond clumsily and completely.

Complicated relationships with fathers and the impact of terrorism on daily life (as in the recent "Dear John"), cruelty among elementary school female students, and moving from apathy to action are themes sounded in the film.

For the role, Pattison, whose fierce good looks recall Marlon Brando, James Dean and Elvis Presley, is grungy, unshaven and wears disheveled clothing. Yes, he utilizes his dark, heavy eyebrows and downcast look to emphasize a brooding presence.

DeRavin ("The Hills Have Eyes" and TV's "Lost"), who is like a young Jennifer Jason Leigh, is believable.

The screenplay by Will Fetters gives a sense of real conversation between twentysomethings, here, Ally and Tyler, with nervous syntax, sidelong glances and awkward hand gestures. The other main characters are similarly deftly sketched.

The philosophical spine references a quote attributed to Ghandi: "Whatever you do will be insignificant, but it is very important that you do it."

Director Allen Coulter ("Hollywoodland" and TV's "The Sopranos," "Sex and the City") has created a mini-classic about contemporary American society.

You won't forget "Remember Me."

"Remember Me": MPAA Rated PG-13 (Parents Strongly Cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13) for violence, sexual content, language and smoking; Genre: Drama, Romance; Run time: 1 hr., 53 mins.; Distributed by Summit Entertainment.

Credit Readers Anonymous: "Remember Me" was filmed in New York City and environs.

Box Office, March 12: "Alice in Wonderland" kept four new challengers at bay, continuing at No.1 with an impressive $62 million, for $208.6 million after two weeks.

"Green Zone," starring Matt Damon, was a distant No. 2, opening with $14.5 million. "She's Out of My League" opened at No. 3, with $9.6 million. "Remember Me" opened at No. 4 with a disappointing $8.3 million.

5. "Shutter Island," $8.1 million, $108 million, four weeks; 6 "Our Family Wedding," opening, $7.6 million; 7. "Avatar," $6.6 million, $730.3 million, 13 weeks; 8. "Brooklyn's Finest," $4.2 million, $21.3 million, two weeks; 9. "Cop Out," $4.2 million, $39.4 million, three weeks; 10. "The Crazies," $3.6 million, $33.3 million, three weeks

Unreel: March 19: "The Bounty Hunter" stars Gerard Butler as a bounty hunter on the trail of Jennifer Anniston as his ex-wife and a reporter. Soon, the two become the object of a chase by "Sopranos"-style New Jersey mobsters.

"Diary of A Wimpy Kid" is based on writer Jeff Kinney's web-comic about a seventh grader's daily life chronicled in a dairy his mother makes him keep. After debuting in 2004, it became a daily online comicstrip and series of novels said to rival "Twilight" in popularity.

"Repo Men" stars Jude Law, Forest Whitaker and Alice Braga in a science fiction story about the sale of artificial organs. If you can't keep up the payments, parts of you could literally be repossessed.

Three Popcorn Boxes out of Five Popcorn Boxes