One thing the capital murder trial of abortion doctor Kermit Gosnell managed to do was energize the pro-life forces against the abortion industry.

After being found guilty, Gosnell could face execution in the deaths of three babies who authorities say were delivered alive and then killed with scissors at his filthy Philadelphia clinic.

Many believe execution is too easy a way out of this life for an abortion doctor who routinely performed horrible and illegal late-term abortions past this state's 24-week limit. Former clinic employees testified how Gosnell delivered babies who were still moving, whimpering or breathing.

Prosecution testimony revealed one baby was nearly 30 weeks along when it was aborted.

It was so big that Gosnell allegedly joked it could "walk to the bus." A second was said to be alive for some 20 minutes before a clinic worker snipped its neck. A third was born in a toilet and was moving before another clinic employee grabbed it and severed its spinal cord.

Stephen Massof, an unlicensed medical school graduate who could not find a residency, told jurors that Gosnell taught him how to snip babies' spines and that it was something he did at least 100 times at the clinic. He testified that he "felt like a fireman in hell" and that he "couldn't put out all the fires."

During the prosecution's closing arguments, Assistant District Attorney Ed Cameron turned to Gosnell and asked "Are you human? ... 'My dog was treated better than those babies and women."

The doctor simply laughed.

The verdict in the emotional trial generated a flood of online reaction.

"I hope he gets life plus 100 years and has to spend his time in a cell with someone who hates abortionist murderers," said Elaine. "If only our prisons were focused on punishment and not on the comfort, needs and demands of the prisoner. There would be a lot fewer prisoners. I like Sheriff Joe's (Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio's) approach."

The horrific nature of the trial has energized pro-life supporters in challenging the U.S. Supreme Court's 40-year-old Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion.

Michael Ciccocioppo, executive director of the Pennsylvania Pro-Life Federation, said in an e-mail statement: "For the sake of all Gosnell's victims, let us never forget the rampant disregard for life that was allowed to continue for decades in our state.

We hope that in the future politics will not stand in the way of protecting the health and safety of women and newborns."

His letter acknowledged the efforts of Gov. Corbett and the state legislature for imposing tougher inspections and standards for abortion clinics, but he felt that all laws must change to protect the innocent.

"This is really the most that can be done under the tragic U.S. Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade, which brought us abortion on demand and the unspeakable tragedy of Gosnell. It's time to take a second look at Roe - in memory of Gosnell's victims," he said.

Father Frank Pavone, National Director of Priests for Life, agreed that the Gosnell case shines new light on the ongoing right to life debate: "The guilty verdict on charges of killing babies following abortion shows that the law recognizes a point at which the 'right to choose' must yield to the right to life, and also shows that abortionists don't know where that point is. Such laws must be strengthened in every state," he stated.

Gosnell, who made millions with his death clinic, now awaits his fate - either execution or spending his remaining days in prison. Meanwhile, the Gosnell evil has become a rallying point for pro-lifers everywhere.

By Jim Zbick

jzbick@tnonline.com