Wednesday, July 30, 2014
     

Spotlight

Saturday, January 26, 2013
AL ZAGOFSKY/SPECIAL TO THE TIMES NEWS Model, actress, singer Toni Reid of Jim Thorpe is revitalizing her singing career with the hopes of producing a jazz album

If any woman could be called a chick in the 1960s, it would have been Toni Reid. Although she never smoked a cigar, Toni was the White Owl girl - the face and voice for the White Owl cigar campaign.

Dressed in a costume with a headdress, tunic and wristlet cuffs covered with white chicken feathers, in 1967 and 1968, Toni represented the company in personal appearances, magazine and newspaper advertising, and a dozen television commercials.

Saturday, January 12, 2013
AL ZAGOFSKY/SPECIAL TO THE TIMES NEWS Janet Hermann, president of the Friends of the Dimmick Memorial Library (right) talks with Veronika Sostak, a visitor on a getaway from New York City. "I saw the sign 'Book Sale Today'. I love books so I came in. We go to different places to look for book sales. I'm looking to find things I can't find at home."

"I like to work the book sale. I like to be around books. I like to see that we are doing something to support the library."

"I would like to find a way to attract more local people. That's why I'm here on Thursdays," said Janet Hermann, president of the Friends of the Dimmick Memorial Library.

Every Saturday, and on Sundays on festival weekends, from noon to 4 p.m., the Friends Annex of the Dimmick Memorial Library, two doors over at 58 Broadway displays its "Book Sale Today" sign on the porch of its quaint Victorian homestead.

Saturday, January 5, 2013
AL ZAGOFSKY/SPECIAL TO THE TIMES NEWS Grace Wilson (right) and Connie DiJohn kick their heels line dancing at the Jim Thorpe/Penn Kidder Senior Center where Wilson teaches line dancing on Mondays and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., except for holidays and bad weather. Classes are free and the public is invited.

Grace Wilson of Albrightsville is not only looking to dance in all the right places, she's taken up the proverbial baton, or whatever is its equivalent in dancing, and teaches line dancing at the Jim Thorpe/Penn Kidder Senior Center.

Not bad for a 79-year-old who didn't know the first thing about line dancing when her friend introduced her to it in 1999. "A group used to meet at the Albrightsville firehouse," Wilson said. "My friend loved line dancing and talked me into trying it with her."

Saturday, December 15, 2012
The original charter for Pennsylvania set its southern border at the 40th Parallel. This would have place Philadelphia in Maryland. Fighting, followed by negotiations led to creation of a new border, surveyed by Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon.

The Mason-Dixon Line-what is it? Do you recollect that it had something to do with the Civil War?

Well, on this 150th anniversary of the Civil War, when films like Steven Spielberg's Lincoln are attracting a lot of buzz, it is a perfect time to dust off a long forgotten tale about the Mason-Dixon Line-it was not created to separate slave and non-slave states, no, it predated the Civil War by many years - it was created to help preserve the fledgling Pennsylvania colony by settling a festering intercolonial conflict.

Saturday, December 8, 2012
AL ZAGOFSKY/SPECIAL TO THE TIMES NEWS At the age of 30, shortly after birthing her first child, Jaqi Medaris of Palmerton experienced something greater than postpartum depression-her hormones went ballistic leading to a set of behaviors that her doctor diagnosed as manic depressive. Her book, The Missing Link, tells her story.

At the age of 30, shortly after birthing her first child, Jaqi Medaris of Palmerton experienced something greater than postpartum depression - her hormones went ballistic leading to a set of behaviors that her doctor diagnosed as manic depressive.

"My doctor said, that I will be a manic depressive for the rest of my life," Medaris said. "He told me that I would be taking medication for the rest of my life. I kept saying 'No! No! No!'"

Saturday, November 17, 2012
AL ZAGOFSKY/SPECIAL TO THE TIMES NEWS John Drury, president of the Mauch Chunk Museum, holds a display box of packets of anthracite coal. The Jim Thorpe Lions Club supports local Jim Thorpe nonprofits and White's Residential & Family Services in Indiana by selling small packets of anthracite coal. In the background is an image of Josiah White and a print of a portion of the canal system that he engineered.

Recently, when the borough's elementary school children were asked who founded their town, two of the responses were Jim Thorpe and Mark Chunk.

They are hardly alone. The town was established as Mauch Chunk in 1818 by Josiah White, the founder of the Lehigh Coal & Navigation Company. In 1954, the east and west sides of the town merged to form a borough, and it was named Jim Thorpe in honor of the Native American Olympic athlete-whose body was laid to rest in the town but who during his life had never visited it.

Saturday, November 10, 2012
In his short life, Canvass White would oversee or consult in the design of the Lehigh Navigation, the Union Canal, the Schuylkill Navigation, the Delaware and Chesapeake Canal, the Glens Falls feeder canal, the New Haven and Farmington Canal, and the water supply for the city of New York.

Two men are responsible for the transformation of the Lehigh Valley from a frontier into the cradle of the American Industrial Revolution. Those two, although they shared a common surname, were unrelated. They were Josiah White, founder of the Lehigh Coal & Navigation Company, and Canvass White, perhaps the greatest canal builder in America.

Saturday, October 13, 2012
AL ZAGOFSKY/SPECIAL TO THE TIMES NEWS Tim Dugan (standing in left foreground) from the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources led the planting project, the fourth program in their Tree Vitalize Program-previous programs have taken place in Allentown, Bethlehem and Easton and over 2,000 trees have been planted.

A partnership of organizations with three dozen volunteers planted 520 trees as part of a project to transform a former hazardous waste site into a riparian meadow park which already has a boat launch and bike trail.

The site, along the Lehigh River, immediately south of the Rt. 873 bridge, was the location of one of the area's 19th century industries. In 1858, Robert Prince began processing the local iron oxide ore as a paint primer and established the Iron Ore Metallic Paint Company. The plant prospered and in 1879, was relocated to Bowmanstown.

Saturday, October 6, 2012
AL ZAGOFSKY/SPECIAL TO THE TIMES NEWS Mari Gruber in the alley behind the Bear Mountain Butterfly Sanctuary at the burn barrel where she, without warning, became engulfed in flames.

Always the teacher, within seconds of removing her flaming apron and extinguishing her charred shirt, Mari Gruber thought to herself, "Oh God. What about kids with scarves and puffy coats around bonfires?"

Gruber, the proprietor of the Bear Mountain Butterfly Sanctuary in the Penn Forest Township suburb of Jim Thorpe came very close to becoming a burn victim.

"I was in the alley behind the Butterfly Sanctuary building, burning paper and cardboard in my burn barrel," she said. "I burn trash at least once a day.

Saturday, September 8, 2012
AL ZAGOFSKY/SPECIAL TO THE TIMES NEWS Giuseppe Puddu's wood-fired brick pizza oven on wheels is parked beside his L'antico Caffé Italian cafe in the Penn Forest Township suburb of Jim Thorpe.

A wood-fired brick pizza oven on wheels?

Why would anyone build a wood-fired brick pizza oven on wheels?

This was the question put to Giuseppe Puddu who built the wood-fired brick pizza oven on wheels that is parked besides his L'antico Caffé Italian cafe on Rt. 903 at 4 Danner Road in the Penn Forest Township suburb of Jim Thorpe.