Saturday, July 12, 2014
     

Columns

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

Q. Why do they call high blood pressure the silent killer?

High blood pressure known as hypertension is very sneaky. It's called the silent killer, because it usually has no symptoms.

Doctors say you have high blood pressure if you have a reading of 140/90 or higher. A blood pressure reading of 120/80 or lower is considered normal. Prehypertension is blood pressure between 120 and 139 for the top number, or between 80 and 89 for the bottom number.

Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Q. What is St. John's Wort?

St. John's Wort also known as hypericum herb, klamath weed or goat weed is a plant with yellow flowers that are used to make teas and tablets. For centuries, the plant has been considered a remedy for mental problems, including depression and anxiety.

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Q. How many kinds of hepatitis are there?

Your liver helps your body digest food, store energy and remove poisons. Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver that makes it stop working efficiently.

Hepatitis is usually caused by a virus. There are five main hepatitis viruses types A, B, C, D and E. There are several other causes of hepatitis.

Some people who have hepatitis have no symptoms. Others may have loss of appetite, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, fever, muscle and joint pain, diarrhea, dark-colored urine, pale bowel movements, stomach pain, and jaundice.

Wednesday, December 18, 2013
AMY MILLER/TIMES NEWS PHOTOS This is just a sampling of the dozens of cookies TIMES NEWS employees baked for the annual Christmas Cookie Exchange. Everyone was encouraged to not only sample the cookies, but take some home to enjoy as well.

For a number of years now, TIMES NEWS reporter Amy Miller has organized a Christmas cookie exchange at our offices in Mahoning Township. Employees are encouraged to bring three dozen cookies to share with their co-workers, and Amy always provides baggies for everyone to go home with a sampling of wonderful Christmas cookies.

The spread is always colorful, flavorful and generous, filling two long tables to capacity.

In addition to all of her other duties, Amy also compiles the recipes and emails a copy to all of the participants.

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Q. Are nuts really good for your heart?

The Harvard Men's Health Watch reports that studies show healthy men, and those who have already suffered a heart attack, can reduce cardiovascular risk by eating nuts regularly.

Here are some facts about nuts:

Ÿ Fiber. All nuts contain fiber, which helps lower your cholesterol. Fiber also makes you feel full, so you eat less.

Ÿ Some nuts contain plant sterols, a substance that can help lower your cholesterol.

Ÿ Nuts contain mono- and polyunsaturated fats known to benefit the heart.

Wednesday, December 11, 2013
KAREN CIMMS/TIMES NEWS Loaded Rice Pilaf

Looking for an elegant side dish for your Christmas feast? How about a simple, but filling, meat-free weeknight dinner?

Loaded Rice Pilaf may be just what you're looking for.

For years this was my go-to company dish, served alongside my Chicken Marsala or Chicken Normandy, and is adapted from a recipe by Chef James Beard. It makes a great side dish for roast beef or Salisbury steak.

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Q. What exactly does glaucoma do to your eyes?

Glaucoma is defined as a group of diseases that can damage the eye's optic nerve, which carries images from the eye to the brain. Here's how glaucoma works:

A clear fluid flows through a small space at the front of the eye called the "anterior chamber." If you have glaucoma, the fluid drains too slowly out of the eye and pressure builds up. This pressure may damage the optic nerve.

Wednesday, December 4, 2013

As of today we are just three weeks away from Christmas, and if you are anything like me (and just about everyone else I know), you're pretty busy about now.

There's decorating to do, as well as shopping, gift wrapping, writing Christmas cards, grocery shopping, meal planning, cookie baking and maybe even a party or two.

I'm exhausted just writing that.

But wait; in addition to all that extra work, you still have a hungry family sitting around the table, waiting for dinner.

Not to worry. I've got you covered.

Tuesday, December 3, 2013

Q. How successful are heart transplants?

The survival rates for heart transplants have improved steadily since the first successful human heart transplants were done in the late 1960s.

Almost 9 out of 10 patients survive the first year following a heart transplant. After five years, the survival rate drops to about 7 in 10.

After 10 years, the rate drops again to about 5 in 10. After 20 years, about 1.5 in 10 are still ticking.

Approximately 2,300 heart transplants are now performed each year in more than 150 heart-transplant centers in the United States

Friday, November 29, 2013
KAREN CIMMS/TIMES NEWS

Your bird isn't even in the oven yet, but no matter, we're still going to talk about leftovers.

Almost everyone I know who makes Thanksgiving dinner makes much more than is needed for the number of people gathered around the table. Admit it or not, they're cooking for the leftovers.

In fact, I remember Dr. Corky Sweeney telling me years ago that although he would go out to dinner on Thanksgiving Day, he would always make a turkey with all the trimmings that morning. Why? For the leftovers, of course!