Friday, December 26, 2014
     

Features

Friday, May 18, 2012
These better-than-two-foot diameter logs await the saw.

As members of the Polk Township Historical Society gathered at the Burger Sawmill in Kresgeville, brothers Jeff and Clark Burger greeted them. Their father, Johnny Burger, at age 83, is still active in the business.

"He's still the main guy," is the way Jeff put it.

The yard is filled with stacks of different-sized logs, with the smallest logs to be turned into firewood. It used to be sold as pulp but there is no call for pulp anymore. There are a few with a diameter of over two feet. When a truckload of logs comes to the yard it is sorted as it is unloaded, said Clark.

Friday, May 4, 2012
Baby photo of two-year-old Jerome Coonon, whose fate is unknown.

Has the answer to Tamaqua's biggest mystery finally been uncovered?

Resident George Fredericks thinks so. The senior citizen believes in his heart he knows what happened to Jerome Coonon, the two-year-old boy who went missing from a backyard. Jerome was never seen again, a case that stumped police, search teams and even the FBI.

Approaching age 86 and in the twilight of his life, Fredericks, a U.S. Army veteran, wants the story to be known.

"The boy never left that backyard," says Fredericks. "And there was nobody else around."

Saturday, April 28, 2012
AL ZAGOFSKY/SPECIAL TO THE TIMES NEWS Judy Greig on the soprano ukulele and Sy Kipp on the baritone ukulele form the duet, SyanI. SyanI debuted last Saturday at the Groovy Uke benefit concert.

Something old, something new.

That just about sums up SyanI, a fledgling Lehighton-based ukulele duo, formed of something new two retired oldies-but-goodies who are reblooming their Flower Power 60's coming-of-age musical lifestyle and something old, a 60's came-of-age senior lifestyle that partners, Judy Greig and Sy Kipp, like to call "geezer love."

Judy coined the duet's name SyanI, pronounced Sy-an-I, to reflect their partnership of "Sy" (Kipp), "and "I" (Greig) cute, although a tricky play on words.

Friday, April 27, 2012
SPECIAL TO THE TIMES NEWS The jumpmaster in blue to the left of Russ Frank tells him when to jump after the previous person is out of the way. Spectators and a television satellite dish fill the bridge.

Have you ever been told to go jump off a bridge?

Russ Frank of Towamensing Township decided that was what he wanted to do for his 65th birthday.

Bridge Day at Fayettesville, W.Va., is one of two sites in the United States where BASE jumping is legal. BASE stands for bridges, antennas, spans and earth (mountains).

Friday, April 20, 2012
LINDA KOEHLER/TIMES NEWS Polk Elementary's Charlene Taylor and her Odyssey of the Mind team won second place in the regional Odyssey of the Mind competition and on to states last week.

Education's goal is to help children accumulate knowledge, skills, customs and values. Today's educators often try do this in imaginative and creative ways.

Polk Elementary School's teachers fit that bill. Four of them, Charlene Taylor, Jeannine Saylor, Deborah Loughren and Linda Kosakowski, journeyed with several fourth grade students in an odyssey of their own as they prepared for the Odyssey of the Mind challenge.

Friday, April 13, 2012
Scott D. Herring

Six men spanning five generations and 150 years:

George M. Bretz (1842-1895) Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, 1870s-1880s

William H. Rau (1855-1920) Lehigh Valley RR and Pennsylvania Railroad, 1890s

John Horgan, Jr. (1859-1926) Delaware & Hudson Railway, 1905-1926

Watson Bunnell (1871-1950) Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, 1905-1919

George Harvan (1921-2002) Lehigh Coal & Navigation Co. / Lanscoal 1949-1972

Scott D. Herring (1960-present) Independent, 1973-onward

Friday, April 13, 2012
In October, 1995, Herring captured this image of the breaker at Delaware & Hudson Railway's Hudson Coal Company Colliery, Larksville, near Kingston, Pa.

Scott Herring is an artist behind a lens. He's not looking to simply take a picture.

Instead, Herring is using photos to tell the story of our region.

For the past forty years, the Tamaqua native has used two gifts - the technical capability of a camera and his limitless ingenuity - to paint a timeless mural of a rich culture and a disappearing landscape.

The end result is The Hardcoal Chronicles Fortieth Anniversary, a canvas that captures the life and times of the anthracite coal fields and the essence of the hardworking people who built America.

Saturday, April 7, 2012
Brandon Taylor/TIMES NEWS Examples of Chinglish are many on a typical Beijing restaurant menu. The chicken dish is really a stew made with free-range chinkens. "Explosive balls" are really just meat balls.

The life abroad is filled with its inconveniences. Language barriers, cultural differences and lack of proper sandwiches make day-to-day living a bit more arduous than it would be at home. But this lifestyle does have its little pleasures.

For me, it's that wonderful Chinese interpretation of the English language - what we expats call Chinglish. It's basically the result of literal translations of Chinese characters into English text.

Friday, April 6, 2012
Large bas-relief sculptures in the Chapel of Lithuanian Martyrs at St. Peter's Basilica, Rome, are a match to ones found at Tamaqua's SS. Peter and Paul Church. The sculptures were created by the same world-class artist.

Sometimes we journey far away and learn more about our own backyard.

Such was the case recently when four Tamaqua friends traveled 4,400 miles to Rome, Italy, and made a surprising discovery about their church back home.

It happened unexpectedly and left the visitors dumbstruck.

For Bill Savage, it began with a special feeling.

Saturday, March 31, 2012
Brandon Taylor/TIMES NEWS An old tower and its surrounding older neighborhood are threatened by development in a Beijing gone mad for change. Note the smog caused by an over abundance of cars clogging city streets.

For the better part of those angst-filled teenage years and during summers spent at home in Pennsylvania's Coal Region, between college years, I found myself saying, "God, I can't wait to get out of Tamaqua."

Now, having lived in China for three years among Beijing's nearly 20 million people, three million autos and its domineering buildings and dirty streets, the hypocrite in me now says, "God, I can't wait to go home," not indefinitely, but certainly as a short respite from my busy city life.