Sunday, December 28, 2014
     

Spotlight

Saturday, November 6, 2010
BRANDON TAYLOR/TIMES NEWS Large stone statues watch over the sacred burial grounds. Throughout the wooded area were large mounds – the burial sites of other Confucian descendants.

It was like many other temples I'd visited in the last 16 months. Red pillars held up a multi-tiered roof of orange tiles. Incense burned in giant vats in front of the main worship hall filling the air with that distinct temple fragrance. A few worshippers were dressed in traditional garb like the monks I'd seen in Beijing. But this place was special, a former teaching ground for one of China's most well-known scholars and historic figures – this was Confucius' hometown, Qufu in Shandong Province.

Saturday, September 11, 2010
Vertel Martin was investigative coordinator of the 9-11 NYPD Missing Persons Task Force.

Vertel Martin, an associate professor of criminal justice and co-coordinator of the Criminal Justice Program at Northampton Community College, was the investigative coordinator of the 9-11 NYPD Missing Persons Task Force.

She was well qualified to handle the position. A graduate of the FBI National Academy, she served as a lieutenant with the New York City Police Department, from which she retired in 2002. But nothing could prepare a person for such an incredibly difficult task at hand after 9-11.

Saturday, August 14, 2010
Steve Boyd, the Volunteer Re-entry Coordinator for the Carbon County Correctional Facility is looking for volunteers to help with a developing Re-entry Program.

"When I went to the prison, doors started opening for me," said Steve Boyd, a director for Yokefellowship Prison Ministry and the Volunteer Re-entry Coordinator for the Carbon County Correctional Facility.

After searching for a lifetime for the meaning of life, at the age of 62, Boyd retired to his Lehighton farm from a career as an operations manager at the Automatic Switch Company in New Jersey.

Saturday, July 17, 2010
AL ZAGOFSKY/SPECIAL TO THE TIMES NEWS Carole Walbert and Eddie Lukasevich release butterflies at the Denise O'Donnell memorial service on a rainy Saturday morning at the Immaculate Conception Cemetery in Jim Thorpe. "She didn't dream her life. She lived her dreams," Lukasevich said.

More than 80 friends bade farewell to Denise O'Donnell on a rainy Saturday, July 10 morning at the Immaculate Conception Cemetery in Jim Thorpe. The Buddhist ceremony overseen by a saffron and maroon-robed monk prayed to set her spirit on the path to rebirth on a higher plane of existence.

Carole Walbert, executor of the Denise O'Donnell estate, read "An Irish Funeral Prayer" that began, "Death is nothing at all. It does not count. I have only slipped away into the next room."

Saturday, June 12, 2010
PRESS PHOTO BY ARA BARLIEB Wally Ely with his book, "Images of Rail Auto-Train."

When it comes to the subject of trains, Wally Ely has few equals.

Since his father worked on trains, he had the train bug early in life.

Ely retired from the banking industry and is now a volunteer and past president of WK&S Railroad, Kempton, Berks County, which offers seasonal weekend excursions on what is known as its Hawk Mountain Line.

"Officially, Amtrak claims the train is three-quarter-mile long, made up of 18 passenger cars and 33 auto carriers, plus two engines," Wally Ely says of the Auto Train, the subject of his book, Images of Rail Auto-Train.

Saturday, May 22, 2010
The jagged white line is a crack in a sample of a solar cells polycrystalline silicon wafer formed along the boundary of the crystal grains. Tests at Lehighton Electronics, Inc. uncovered micro-cracks in samples that could lead to failures of solar arrays over time.

"With so many people investing in energy conservation," said Austin Blew, "I want to be sure that there are enough precautions and tests being done that failures in the installation over time, don't occur."

Blew is president of Lehighton Electronics, Inc., a 40-year-old Carbon County-based manufacturer of instruments used to qualify solid state materials. In association with an industrial standards organization, LEI had been analyzing samples of polycrystalline silicon, a lower cost material for making solar cells.

Saturday, May 1, 2010
AL ZAGOFSKY/SPECIAL TO THE TIMES NEWS Clockwise from top left: Grandfather Irv Mesher, mom Myra Mesher, and granddaughter Halsie (Mesher) Shoemaker in front of Irv's Rolls-Royce insignia golf cart at Palmerton's Sunny Rest Resort. The three generations have run the resort since 1978. On Memorial Day Weekend, Sunny Rest celebrates its 65th anniversary.

Carbon County's Sunny Rest Resort has discovered the secret of drawing guests year-after-year, for 65 years. As the resort prepares for its 65th anniversary celebration on the May 29 Memorial Day weekend, the family-owned operation is anticipating its biggest season ever.

Saturday, April 17, 2010
Naomi Betancourt (in black) leads Zumba class in the Reggaeton, a Reggae/Hip Hop hybrid dance step at the Dance With Kim studio in Lehighton.

Zumba, the aerobics-gone-salsa dance craze that is making heads turn and hips gyrate, has transformed what used to be known as an exercise workout into a party.

"It's smiling and sweating without commitment," jokes dance and fitness instructor Naomi Betancourt.

Zumba is an aerobic dance exercise party that's spreading across Carbon County. At Dance with Kim in Lehighton, since the fall of 2009, every Monday night the regulars show up to Zumba with Betancourt.

Saturday, February 27, 2010
Amanda Sandlin, a former TIMES NEWS intern and journalism student at Rider University, is teaching in Accra, Ghana, located in western Africa, for a semester.

(Editor's Note: Amanda Sandlin is a 20-year-old junior journalism major at Rider University, and a previous TIMES NEWS intern. A Tamaqua resident, she is studying and volunteering in Accra, Ghana, located in western Africa, for one semester. Ghana gained independence from British rule in 1957, and now is a constitutional democracy. It is classified as a third world country and a developing nation. Amanda's columns will appear periodically on Saturdays in The TIMES NEWS during her stay in Ghana. To read more about her adventures, visit her blog at http://amandasanda.wordpress.com.)

Saturday, January 30, 2010
Amanda Sandlin

(Editor's Note: Amanda Sandlin is a 20-year-old junior journalism major at Rider University, and a previous Times News intern. A Tamaqua resident, she is studying and volunteering in Accra, Ghana, located in western Africa, for one semester. Ghana gained independence from British rule in 1957, and now is a constitutional democracy. It is classified as a third world country and a developing nation. Amanda's columns will appear periodically on Saturdays in The TIMES NEWS during her stay in Ghana.)