Tuesday, January 27, 2015
     

Spotlight

Saturday, March 2, 2013
Aiden Sell and Joseph Zerecie spread the boards that will make a birdhouse.

Bluebirds commonly nested in cavities in trees or fence posts, said Lehigh Gap Nature Center Director Dan Kunkle. Each year the Center holds a bluebird house-building project. Today, orchard trees are small and posts are metal so there are fewer natural nesting sites and a decline in the number of Bluebirds occurred.

In the 1960s Bluebird housing was begun to be provided. A house occasionally was occupied as soon as it was put up.

Saturday, February 23, 2013
ELSA KERSCHNER/TIMES NEWS Diane Husic talked about the work of the past 10 years at a Speakers Series talk. One of the researchers is Marla Bianca who is doing metal analysis on the Lehigh Gap Wildlife Refuge.

Diane Husic, a board of directors member at Lehigh Gap Wildlife Refuge, Slatington, updated the public on many of the things that have been accomplished in the past 10 years.

The land in the Gap was purchased in 2002 and by the following year restoration with warm season grasses was begun.

Eighty years of zinc smelting in Palmerton left the mountain dry, windswept and bare.

Ecological restoration is the intentional process of assisting the recovery of degraded landscape. It enhances biodiversity and attempts to return it back to what it was.

Saturday, February 9, 2013
"I like to read," said Diane Luicana. "I'm social, so just reading quietly alone doesn't always do it for me. So I thought this would be a way to read something that other people might also like, and then have a chance to meet people who also like to read. I just thought it would be fun."

If you love to read and would love to share what you've read and discuss it with others, then you, like Diane Luicana, can look forward to the first meeting of the Jim Thorpe Book Club on Valentine's Day, Thursday, February 14 at 6:30 p.m. at the Friends of the Dimmick Memorial Library House at 58 Broadway in Jim Thorpe.

Saturday, February 2, 2013
DONALD R. SERFASS/TIMES NEWS  Tamaqua Historical Society volunteer Jim Barron, left, and photographer Scott Herring pause Tuesday after hanging the first in a series of classic street scene images of 1987 Tamaqua.

A special collection of iconic Tamaqua scenes caught in color will be unveiled in the coming days, heralding the local arrival of 'The Hardcoal Chronicles,' the work of Tamaqua native Scott Herring.

The photos are expected to be in place at gallery space inside the Tamaqua Area Chamber of Commerce office, West Broad Street, within the next two weeks.

Saturday, January 26, 2013
AL ZAGOFSKY/SPECIAL TO THE TIMES NEWS Model, actress, singer Toni Reid of Jim Thorpe is revitalizing her singing career with the hopes of producing a jazz album

If any woman could be called a chick in the 1960s, it would have been Toni Reid. Although she never smoked a cigar, Toni was the White Owl girl - the face and voice for the White Owl cigar campaign.

Dressed in a costume with a headdress, tunic and wristlet cuffs covered with white chicken feathers, in 1967 and 1968, Toni represented the company in personal appearances, magazine and newspaper advertising, and a dozen television commercials.

Saturday, January 12, 2013
AL ZAGOFSKY/SPECIAL TO THE TIMES NEWS Janet Hermann, president of the Friends of the Dimmick Memorial Library (right) talks with Veronika Sostak, a visitor on a getaway from New York City. "I saw the sign 'Book Sale Today'. I love books so I came in. We go to different places to look for book sales. I'm looking to find things I can't find at home."

"I like to work the book sale. I like to be around books. I like to see that we are doing something to support the library."

"I would like to find a way to attract more local people. That's why I'm here on Thursdays," said Janet Hermann, president of the Friends of the Dimmick Memorial Library.

Every Saturday, and on Sundays on festival weekends, from noon to 4 p.m., the Friends Annex of the Dimmick Memorial Library, two doors over at 58 Broadway displays its "Book Sale Today" sign on the porch of its quaint Victorian homestead.

Saturday, January 5, 2013
AL ZAGOFSKY/SPECIAL TO THE TIMES NEWS Grace Wilson (right) and Connie DiJohn kick their heels line dancing at the Jim Thorpe/Penn Kidder Senior Center where Wilson teaches line dancing on Mondays and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., except for holidays and bad weather. Classes are free and the public is invited.

Grace Wilson of Albrightsville is not only looking to dance in all the right places, she's taken up the proverbial baton, or whatever is its equivalent in dancing, and teaches line dancing at the Jim Thorpe/Penn Kidder Senior Center.

Not bad for a 79-year-old who didn't know the first thing about line dancing when her friend introduced her to it in 1999. "A group used to meet at the Albrightsville firehouse," Wilson said. "My friend loved line dancing and talked me into trying it with her."

Saturday, December 15, 2012
The original charter for Pennsylvania set its southern border at the 40th Parallel. This would have place Philadelphia in Maryland. Fighting, followed by negotiations led to creation of a new border, surveyed by Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon.

The Mason-Dixon Line-what is it? Do you recollect that it had something to do with the Civil War?

Well, on this 150th anniversary of the Civil War, when films like Steven Spielberg's Lincoln are attracting a lot of buzz, it is a perfect time to dust off a long forgotten tale about the Mason-Dixon Line-it was not created to separate slave and non-slave states, no, it predated the Civil War by many years - it was created to help preserve the fledgling Pennsylvania colony by settling a festering intercolonial conflict.

Saturday, December 8, 2012
AL ZAGOFSKY/SPECIAL TO THE TIMES NEWS At the age of 30, shortly after birthing her first child, Jaqi Medaris of Palmerton experienced something greater than postpartum depression-her hormones went ballistic leading to a set of behaviors that her doctor diagnosed as manic depressive. Her book, The Missing Link, tells her story.

At the age of 30, shortly after birthing her first child, Jaqi Medaris of Palmerton experienced something greater than postpartum depression - her hormones went ballistic leading to a set of behaviors that her doctor diagnosed as manic depressive.

"My doctor said, that I will be a manic depressive for the rest of my life," Medaris said. "He told me that I would be taking medication for the rest of my life. I kept saying 'No! No! No!'"

Saturday, November 17, 2012
AL ZAGOFSKY/SPECIAL TO THE TIMES NEWS John Drury, president of the Mauch Chunk Museum, holds a display box of packets of anthracite coal. The Jim Thorpe Lions Club supports local Jim Thorpe nonprofits and White's Residential & Family Services in Indiana by selling small packets of anthracite coal. In the background is an image of Josiah White and a print of a portion of the canal system that he engineered.

Recently, when the borough's elementary school children were asked who founded their town, two of the responses were Jim Thorpe and Mark Chunk.

They are hardly alone. The town was established as Mauch Chunk in 1818 by Josiah White, the founder of the Lehigh Coal & Navigation Company. In 1954, the east and west sides of the town merged to form a borough, and it was named Jim Thorpe in honor of the Native American Olympic athlete-whose body was laid to rest in the town but who during his life had never visited it.