Sunday, July 13, 2014
     

Features

Saturday, August 18, 2012
ANDREW LEIBENGUTH/TIMES NEWS A soldier with the Army's 3rd Infantry Regiment marches past the Tomb of the Unknowns, located in the center of the cemetery. The soldiers, who guard the tomb 24 hours a day, routinely perform a Changing of the Guards ceremony at the Tomb.

Serving as the most hallowed burial ground of our Nation's fallen, the Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia honors those men and woman who have served our nation and their families by providing a sense of beauty, patriotic respect and peace.

Arlington serves as a final resting place for over 300,000 American military servicemen or women. This total does not include veterans who've not been found. Those people are represented by the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, located in the center of the cemetery.

Friday, August 17, 2012
LINDA KOEHLER/TIMES NEWS Carmela Heard instructs a StrongWomen class in stretching.

Carmela Heard stands in front of a group of women ranging in ages from 40 to 80, stretching her arms high over her head, leaning far over to her right. In a soothing soft voice, she encourages the women to push their limits, something a strong woman would do.

Carmela is the epitome of a strong woman as an instructor of the StrongWomen program.

She learned about the StrongWomen program through another fitness instructor and decided she wanted to get involved.

Friday, August 17, 2012
LINDA KOEHLER/TIMES NEWS The StrongWomen program offers classes in stretching and strength training.

"It doesn't matter who you are, where you come from. The ability to triumph begins with you. Always." Oprah Winfrey.

Women of today believe that statement.

Women strive to be the best they can be in everything they do. One of the highest accolades a woman can receive is to be considered "strong."

Friday, August 10, 2012
Carl and Louise Mengel promenade during the square dance held at the park pavilion.

People looked at a sleigh outside the barn at Ontelaunee Park, New Tripoli, and asked each other why the shafts were offset. Willard Snyder suggested the possibility that it gave the horse better traction and several suggested it would allow the driver a better view ahead.

Friday, August 3, 2012
SHIRLEY MILLER/SPECIAL TO THE TIMES NEWS For 54 years, a dramatic carousel was located at Lakewood Park, seven miles from Tamaqua before being moved to Michigan.

One of Pennsylvania's most thrilling carousels was located just seven miles from Tamaqua and still exists, but is now located in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

The Lakewood Park carousel is a rare work of art, one of only three built and a creation of Spillman Engineering.

It incorporates six horses made by Charles Looff, a competitor of Spillman, and two more by another builder, either Muller or Carmel, nobody is certain.

Friday, August 3, 2012
DONALD R. SERFASS/TIMES NEWS David Dailey, Jr., Palmerton, wanted to teach himself how to carve wood. The end result is a1916-style C.W. Parker carousel jumper horse.

David M. Dailey, Jr. wanted to learn how to carve wood in his spare time.

Most folks with that yearning would take a knife and whittle away at a stick.

But Dailey isn't most folks. The Palmerton man is a study in contrasts, a guy who breaks the mold.

Saturday, July 28, 2012
Brandon Taylor

Columbine. Virginia Tech. Aurora.

When are we going to learn?

Reading about the recent tragedy in Colorado, the story of a man gone mad and a defenseless crowd of theater-goers forced to play witness to their own horror film, was saddening, depressing. But it wasn't surprising.

Saturday, July 21, 2012
Friday, July 20, 2012

Flowered hats and fancy tea cups were to be seen throughout Wesley Hall of Effort United Methodist Church when it held a Victorian Tea.

Dee Juris and Rosalie Juris were the co-chairs for the tea. Dee said they held one last year but the number of guests doubled as people were invited from other churches for the 2012 event.

Someone comes in the door and is congratulated on the beauty of her hat. She said she just brought a cheap hat and glued flowers on it. Others seconded that source for their hats, but some came from attics and a horseback rider had a pink cowboy hat.

Friday, July 13, 2012
COURTESY NO. 9 MINE MUSEUM In this early image, the LCN offices are seen to the right. The dark tunnel entrance is visible to the far left, carved into solid rock beneath Edgemont Road.

Lansford and Hauto are only a mile apart. Yet the travel distance is ten to twelve miles.

But for 122 years, such wasn't the case. There was a time when an engineering marvel called the Lansford-Hauto Railroad Tunnel provided a straight-line locomotive route through Nesquehoning Mountain, the geographic obstacle separating the two communities.