Wednesday, July 27, 2016
     

Features

Saturday, February 13, 2016

He reflects on a yearning he once held deep inside and a quiet plea made to the heavens.

It happened after he’d dealt with heartbreak.

He’d been married 64 years. But his beloved wife Rita died in 2006 at age 88.

Walter mourned her passing. But he also felt he wanted companionship once again — if only he could meet the right one.

“I was quite lonely,” he says. “I asked the Lord to send someone my way.”

And then it happened.

Saturday, January 30, 2016

Steam enthusiasts, rejoice.

A Reading Company Class T-1 4-8-4 Northern locomotive that has not been seen on the rails in nearly a quarter century will soon rise like a phoenix out of the ashes to again take its rightful place in the railroading industry.

Reading Blue Mountain and Northern Railroad in Port Clinton announced this past week that it has begun working on restoring the Reading 2102, one of four remaining T-1 4-8-4 engines in the world.

Andy Muller Jr., owner and CEO of RBMN, anticipates that the T-1 will be operational by mid-2017.

Saturday, January 2, 2016

The New Year holiday is a time to look forward.

But at the Tamaqua Historical Society, they’re looking back.

Society members are reflecting on the Baily photo collection, a legacy of photography that started 155 years ago. The images are carefully packed in more than 100 boxes stored in a fireproof vault.

Saturday, December 26, 2015

For needy children of hardworking miners, Christmas wasn’t red and green, it was orange.

That’s because kindhearted Sophia Georgianna Coxe routinely gave youngsters a gift of something they’d not otherwise see — citrus fruit.

Coxe was the wife of coal baron Eckley Coxe, and was known for being caring and compassionate, earning her the nickname “Angel of the Anthracite.”

She knew that miners lived a meager existence. Life was difficult for mining families, including young children, and Christmas could be a difficult time.

Saturday, December 19, 2015

They met by chance.

Tim “Dutch” Yeakel of Carbon County and Dan “Curley” Thompson of Schuylkill County were strangers only a few weeks ago.

But the two hobbyists shared a common dream — to create the perfect motorized, gasoline-powered bicycle.

The two met unexpectedly recently when Yeakel, on a short trip, was diverted through Coaldale after a tractor-trailer crashed at the bottom of the Broad Mountain near Nesquehoning.

“There was a detour,” he said.

Saturday, November 21, 2015

Good things happen to James Denny.

As a sixth-grader living in south Jersey, his home was a safe haven for poor kids from Camden who would come to Denny’s house to play basketball and eat meals rather than wander unsafe city streets. He saw at a young age what happens when kindness is offered. The good side of people is what you see in return.

A year ago, he entered a television contest to win a custom tree house for his family. Denny, who lives in Jim Thorpe, wanted to give the house as a gift to his mother who raised a wonderful family mostly on her own.

Friday, October 9, 2015

Now that the fair season is wrapping up, the Highland cattle of Bull Run Farm in Lehighton can kick their hooves up and just enjoy the leisure life.

Even with the days shortening and the weather getting cooler the prize winning herbivores are at ease in their double-layered fur coats.

Highland cattle originate from Scotland and are one of the oldest breeds in the world.

Saturday, August 15, 2015
DONALD R. SERFASS/TIMES NEWS  Tamaqua dancer Amanda Carson performs with a saber on South Swatara Street about 8 p.m. during the peak of the Dear Tamaqua extravaganza.

Tamaqua's summer spectacle was a showpiece of collaboration and the poster child for cooperation.

Dear Tamaqua ... In a New Light was a multimedia walking experience presented by the Tamaqua Community Arts Center on Aug. 4.

The event culminated two years of devotion by 70 volunteers who corralled their own talents and drew on strengths of others.

Saturday, August 15, 2015
DONALD R. SERFASS/TIMES NEWS As darkness falls, workers put finishing touches on a 400-foot-long lighted tunnel near the train depot.

The props, stages and imagery of Dear Tamaqua came to life through a wide range of local talent.

Orb construction was done by Ben, Ethan and Ben H. Turrano; mini-stages were engineered by Dave Johns and Stephen Bayer with painting by Owen and Mitchell Sabol.

Pipe sanding and painting were in the hands of Paul Miller and John Szeliga, while construction of a 400-ft. tunnel and art installation was completed by Tamaqua Borough workers Kevin Steigerwalt, Rob Jones, Matt Mateyak, Steve Naylor, Mark Leiby, Aaron Coggiano and Richard Miller.

Saturday, August 8, 2015
DONALD R. SERFASS/TIMES NEWS The classic rock sound of Sapphire is featured July 30 at the 52 Annual Schuylkill County Fair.

At this event, the legendary occupations in coal mining and railroad take a back seat.

The Schuylkill County Fair salutes the county's number one industry – agriculture.

It's an industry often overlooked.

Many people don't realize the county's 780 square miles include fertile agricultural valleys between the Blue Mountain range in the south and the Susquehanna River to the north, including scenic Lewistown and New England valleys just outside of Tamaqua.