Tuesday, October 21, 2014
     

Features

Friday, August 15, 2014
DONALD R. SERFASS/TIMES NEWS Restoration of the 1874 Tamaqua train station took ten years and $1.5 million.

Ten years ago, a spirited group of volunteers showed what can be done when a community decides to build rather then destroy.

The Tamaqua Save Our Station committee set their sights on the town's 1874 train station with a promise to return it to glory as hub of the community.

The never-say-die band of rail fans made sure the 1874 Philadelphia and Reading Passenger Depot would re-emerge as the shining jewel of Schuylkill County's largest borough.

Saturday, August 9, 2014
Justin Carlucci/Times News Crowds gather at Mahoning Valley Speedway on Saturday nights.

If you're a local fan of racing or simply looking for a new experience, the Mahoning Valley Speedway is the place to be on a Saturday night.

Locals and race enthusiasts from all over northeastern Pennsylvania venture out to the racetrack on a weekly basis.

Friday, August 8, 2014
ELSA KERSCHNER/TIMES NEWS A "chimney" is used to pre-heat the charcoal.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints held a summer picnic near Lehighton in conjunction with its annual Pioneer Day.

Carrying out the pioneer theme, which celebrates the move to Utah when the Mormons were persecuted in Illinois, cooking was done in Dutch ovens.

The event also celebrated the 35th anniversary of the branch (church).

Gary Schoenberger, who was taking a turn cooking the hot dogs and hamburgers over an open fire, said heat can be controlled in the Dutch ovens by how many pieces of charcoal are used both under and on top of the oven.

Friday, August 1, 2014
ROY ACKERMAN PHOTO 1954: Rush Township Police Chief William Klotz, right, demonstrates a two-way radio with Tamaqua patrolman Harry Dornblaser. The historic image was taken on Aug. 1, 1954, on West Rowe Street near the Tamaqua police station.

How does a cop arrest a culprit if there's no place to lock him up?

The answer is to find a nearby police station that has a jail.

But how does an officer do that when his access to communications is limited?

These were some of the questions facing William B. Klotz, Rush Township's first policeman and advocate for two-way police radios.

It's hard to imagine, but there was a time when police had no easy way to communicate between patrol cars and police headquarters.

Saturday, July 26, 2014
SPECIAL TO THE TIMES NEWS Best friends and biking buddies, Anne Messick, left, and Tracy Smith, are in training as they prepare for a 150-mile bike Ride to Conquer Cancer in October.

Tracy Smith of Palmerton is in training.

She's biking her heart out and is planning on participating in The Ride to Conquer Cancer, a 150-mile bike ride Oct. 11-12.

Conquering cancer is a personal crusade for Smith. Her father, Manuel Muniz, recently lost his battle with pancreatic cancer.

Even closer to home, her husband of 27 years, Scott, is currently battling the incurable multiple myeloma, which he was diagnosed with four years ago.

Friday, July 25, 2014
ARCHIVES/DONALD R. SERFASS Sister Bernard Agnes, IHM, principal, Marian High School, is flanked by Ralph Cipko, left, and brother Daniel on June 1, 2001, on occasion of a Cipko donation, one of many.

They were rich and mysterious.

Caring and kindhearted.

And without question, eccentric.

In fact, on an eccentricity scale of one to 10, they scored a 20.

Daniel and Ralph, the brothers Cipko, were Carbon County's dynamic duo of donations.

Some believe they gave away the lion's share of $10 million, or maybe more.

In the process, the black-garbed pair became a media sensation. The men were subject to intense scrutiny, even controversy. At one point, they spawned a fan club which had its own newsletter filled with Cipko trivia.

Friday, July 18, 2014
LINDA KOEHLER/TIMES NEWS Carol Sue and Kerry Gougher of Palmerton sit at a table made from a willow tree trunk that was on neighbor Terry Eckhart's property. Frank Hagar wanted to make a table out of it and encouraged Kerry to do the same. Kerry made this table and benches and one other with four tree stump chairs for their backyard paradise.

When Carol Sue and Kerry Gougher sit on their backyard porch, they can view a 10-year labor of love.

What they have created is a stunningly beautiful natural oasis. It's almost like visiting a botanical garden.

Saturday, July 12, 2014
Jordan Reabold/Times News Mark Mason gently coaxes Mykonos to behave like the champion he is. "Horses respond to kindness," he said.

Mason Training Stables in Lehighton took home a number of awards from the Western New York Morgan Horse Show over Memorial Day weekend.

The show took place from May 23 to 25 at the Show-plex at Erie County Fairgrounds in Hamburg, New York.

There were about 250 horses present at the show, belonging to stables from Pennsylvania and surrounding areas, including Massachusetts, Ohio and New York.

To prepare for the show, owner Mark Mason begins each horse with a standard type of training.

Friday, July 11, 2014
Coal cars, left, wait to be hoisted from the foot of the Mahanoy Plane in this 1890s image.

In 1868, the most powerful engines in the world were located 16 miles west of Tamaqua.

The power was necessary to hoist coal up a mountainside, coal that helped to build the country.

The engines were part of an amazing coal-car inclined railroad known as the Mahanoy Plane, an engineering marvel that boosted coal cars from the valley town of Mahanoy Plane, part of Gilberton, up a mountainside some 2,460 feet to Frackville.

The inclined plane railroad spanned two points separated by a rise of 524 feet.

Saturday, June 28, 2014
LISA PRICE/TIMES NEWSCSI CAMPER TERRA STEIGERWALK USES THE "MEASURING MASTER" WHEEL TO CHECK THE LENGTH OF SKID MARKS.

Here are a couple clues that this is not your typical summer day camp experience: the Med-Evac helicopter landed, firefighters cut a crash victim out of a vehicle, and a narcotics dog found some pot in the garage.

On the last day of camp, a "body" was found on the floor inside, along with a couple of bloody footprints, fingerprints on the cash register and bullet holes through the walls. A possible "witness" to the crime, Bubba Ray, was a tough interview, since he was more concerned about his lost dog.