Tuesday, September 16, 2014
     

Columns

Saturday, May 17, 2014

Let's face it, no one likes to lose.

Anyone who has ever participated in any type of competition would certainly choose being on the winning side rather than on the losing end.

I was one of those kids who had some natural athletic ability and was fortunate enough to always have been on a team that won more often than not.

Winning is easy. When the game is over, you smile and shake the hands of your opponents and let them know that it was a good game.

Saturday, May 17, 2014

Our mothers always tell us to get a good night's sleep, but for some it is really difficult if not impossible. According to a National Sleep Foundation poll, 20 percent of Americans are sleeping less than six hours a night up from 12 percent in 1998. In contrast, only 21 percent get eight hours of sleep. Most Americans, 56 percent, get between six and eight hours of sleep, but is that sleep refreshing? That is a whole different question.

Saturday, May 17, 2014

One of the things I like best about doing newspaper features is that I constantly learn something new.

This week I covered a meeting where the civilian crime prevention specialist in our county talked about ways to protect ourselves against fraud.

We hear a lot these days about identity theft. But before I heard that talk I didn't think it was much of a problem. After all, what are the odds someone will steal our identity?

A lot higher than you think, said Dale Phillips, citing the escalating number of people who fall victim to identity thief and credit card fraud.

Saturday, May 17, 2014

The Supreme Court screwed up, and almost half of the justices know it.

In Galloway versus Greece, the Court upheld state-sponsored prayer, such as religious readings held before public or government meetings.

The vote two weeks ago showed their indecision, 5-4.

Essentially, the court decided that sectarian prayers led by a town councilman, for example, do not violate the Constitution.

On the surface, that doesn't sound too bad. It actually sounds nice. But here's the key.

Saturday, May 17, 2014

Shirley flipped her wig. Dora almost made everyone pee in their pants. Devoe lost it. Diann strutted her stuff. Renee led the band. Brenda kicked up her short little legs. Diane sailed away. Connie jumped up and down. Cheryl kept us all on track. And I realized something very profound last Saturday ... this lovely bunch of coconuts are all sisters of my heart.

Saturday, May 10, 2014

While in Texas, Becky and Vernon took us to the National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame in Fort Worth.

"Ye-haw" and "Yippie ki yi yippie yippie yah!" Let's hear it for the cowgirls!

The museum honors women of the American West who have displayed extraordinary courage and pioneering fortitude. It is an educational resource and each year adds honorees to its Hall of Fame in four different categories: champions and competitive performers; ranchers (stewards of land and livestock); entertainers, artists and writers; trailblazers and pioneers.

Saturday, May 10, 2014

I have come back to Pennsylvania with the sad report that we did not spot Nessie while on holiday in Scotland, and trust me, we looked.

Evidently, so do the folks who operate tour boats on the Loch.

The little tour boat that took us to Urquhart Castle came equipped with some impressive radar equipment that seemed rather out of place on such a small vessel.

Oddly enough, the gentleman who put our tour together informed our group that one of the tour boats had picked up some large and inexplicable images on the radar the day after we left.

Hmmm.

Saturday, May 10, 2014

I just read a Washington Post story in which scientists claim they have uncovered the secret of how the pyramid stones were moved without using modern technology. This is the latest in a series of explanations as to how the pyramids were constructed. Based on hieroglyphics found on a wall in one of the tombs, scientists speculated the ancient engineers cut the stone and then used a sledge to move it across the desert to the building site.

Saturday, May 10, 2014

Last week, when I joined in a small discussion group, the leader's topic was mothers.

Specifically, we were asked to discuss the kind of mothering we experienced and our reaction to it.

There were only six in our group, and five of the six entered into lively conversation about the kind of mothering they had.

I was the only quiet one. The reason is because it's too painful to think about my mother. I am ashamed of how I didn't give her the reverence and the appreciation she deserved.

Saturday, May 10, 2014

By BOB FORD

bford@tnonline.com

O say can you see by the dawn's early light.

Ever since growing up on military bases up and down the East Coast these words have had a certain effect on me.

I can still remember evenings as a child of 4 or 5 years old playing with my friends in the playground of Fort Fisher Air Force base in North Carolina and hearing the bugle blare letting us know that the "Lowering of the Colors" was about to begin and the "Star Spangled Banner" would be playing. We would all stop, face the flag and be quiet.