Wednesday, May 25, 2016
     

Columns

Saturday, April 7, 2012

I'm convinced that Olive Garden is a culinary dividing line.

There are those who love the place, especially the breadsticks. And then there are those who despise it, calling it phony Italian, microwaved food.

For some, a trip to Olive Garden is a special treat. But others say the place is a fraud because the food is unlike anything served in Tuscany, contrary to the restaurant's promises.

Saturday, April 7, 2012

Easter egg hunts are one of those spring time events that one looks forward to as a child almost as much as Christmas sometimes.

The excitement of seeing brightly colored eggs scattered across the field or on a hillside and the eagerness of waiting for some lucky adult to give the signal to "GO!" can bring out the child in almost everyone again.

Saturday, April 7, 2012

This morning as I was watching "Good Morning America," I heard this snippet about President Obama's statement he made at The Associated Press luncheon about the use of a word former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney said to describe Paul Ryan's budget. The word was "marvelous."

Saturday, April 7, 2012

By DEN MCLAUGHLIN

dmclaughlintnonline.com

Some Saturday humor.

A man hands the teller at his bank a withdrawal slip for $400. He says, "May I have large bills, please". The teller looks at him and says, "I'm sorry sir, all the bills are the same size."

Saturday, April 7, 2012

By BOB URBAN

rurban@tnonline.com

My good friend, Jack, who lives out of state, emailed me several weeks ago.

He was hurting.

He informed me that he had to put his dog down the day before, and he was in agony over the decision. The pet he had was 12 years old, and had become a bonifide member of the family throughout those years.

But age, and ailments, had caught up to him, and that necessitated Jack to play God, and decide on putting the dog out of his misery. It was a decision he dreaded.

Saturday, April 7, 2012

JIM:

It's Holy Saturday. My mind goes back half a century to when I was an altar boy in St. Joseph's Parish in Jim Thorpe. Every Saturday night during Lent, the pastor led us in the Stations of the Cross. I was often one of the two altar boys who accompanied him around the walls of the church, stopping (if memory serves) some 13 times to contemplate each of the tortures that were inflicted on Jesus.

Saturday, April 7, 2012

This is the 100th article that I have written since I started voicing my opinions concerning our government and our society. I never thought that I would be able to produce a new article each week. Thankfully, our government and our politicians give me plenty to write about. I would like to thank all of you who read my articles and e-mail me your comments. This "Centennial" article is too big for a single issue, so I am breaking it into two parts. The first part describes how President Obama will manipulate the voters to ensure he is elected in November.

Saturday, March 31, 2012

Time sure passes quickly by when you aren't paying attention. It seems like just yesterday when we made our first trip to the playground with Kathryn when she was around seven months old on Mother's Day. She was so tiny that we could barely get her to sit up in the smallest swings to take her picture that first time, and we sat her on the little sliding board and gently slid her down the board from top to bottom as she looked at us wondering what we were doing to her.

Saturday, March 31, 2012

JIM:

In last week's column, I reported on how the students I led on a study-tour of China over my university's spring break managed - within three hours of their arrival in Beijing - to have Mickey D delivered directly to their hotel rooms. Closely rivaling this passion for fast food was their penchant for shopping.

Saturday, March 31, 2012

In a 1912 article titled "The Fight Against the Sweat Shop," a Tamaqua Courier writer talked about how conditions in America's factories and home workshops had changed over the previous decade, thanks to advocates to improve conditions in the workplace.

He said there was a time when "half of the country homes" took in work from the shoe, hat and clothing factories. In Brooklyn, he said there were 4,000 places licensed to do home manufacturing.