Friday, May 6, 2016
     

Columns

Saturday, June 2, 2012

JIM:

Saturday, May 26, 2012

Local residents were stunned to hear news of the death of Wilbur Wright after the aviation pioneer fell ill on a business trip to Boston in April, 1912.

After returning to Dayton, he was diagnosed with typhoid fever. He lingered in and out of consciousness for several weeks before his death in the Wright family home on May 30.

Saturday, May 26, 2012

Questions that make you scratch your head while you're contemplating what you're going to do during this long Memorial Day weekend.

Have you ever wondered......

Why do they use sterilized needles for lethal injections?

Why doesn't Tarzan have a beard?

Why does Superman stop bullets with his chest, but ducks when you throw a revolver at him?

Why did Kamikaze pilots wear helmets?

Whose cruel idea was it to put an "s" in the word "lisp"?

If people evolved from apes, why are there still apes?

Saturday, May 26, 2012

love simplicity. When you want to buy something, the actual price should be disclosed. For several years now, businesses have been changing their pricing so that their goods and services appear less expensive than their competitors. For example, most passengers book airline travel based on the price of the ticket. To appear to be the low cost provider, the airline sells the ticket at very low price. When the passenger arrives at the airport, they are hit with a myriad of additional charges and fees.

Saturday, May 26, 2012

"How about this?" Harry held up my antique wooden sauerkraut masher.

"No," I responded.

"How about this?" he pointed to my large copper boiler.

"No!"

When he reached for my beautiful antique wooden grape harvest basket, I just glared at him and said, "Funny."

He grinned, knowing he got my goat.

"Just kidding," he said. But I wasn't so sure.

Saturday, May 26, 2012

In 1854, the Panther Valley was a bustling region growing with the support of the economy created by King Coal.

It was an area on its way up in the world. Churches were being established, taverns were being designed and built and the fledgling communities were well on their way.

Besides the happy places, there was also a need for those whose lives were coming to a close. In the mid 1800's, the industrialists building and running the mines realized that most of the valley was full of coal and they needed places to bury the departed.

Saturday, May 26, 2012

Welcome to Memorial Day weekend, the unofficial start of summer.

For many, it marks a time to uncover the pool, break out the grill, and honor all those who continue to preserve our freedom.

Assuredly, there won't be any shortage of pool parties, family outings and veterans' services to keep us occupied over the long weekend.

Which leads me to wonder how many of us actually plan to participate in any good old-fashioned outdoor activities that seem to have been phased out over time.

Saturday, May 26, 2012

CLAIRE:

I spent last weekend at the Philadelphia Zoo with my boyfriend and his two-year-old nephew, Layne. I hadn't been to the zoo in years, and so a few things came as a bit of a shock to me. One was the price of admission; like everything else, it's risen. A day out at the zoo with your family can set you back almost a hundred dollars but then, I guess the price of polar bear food has probably gone up as well.

Saturday, May 26, 2012

I'm sitting here sick in the stomach for the fourth time this year because, once again, I am watching a treasured friend lose her home.

Once again, I'm stunned that people that old are homeless.

My friend is 72. Her husband is 75. I know them for eight years. In all that time, I have never seen them spend money for anything except necessities. Not one single so-called luxury, unless you call food a luxury.

But they do have a lovely home. At least they do until next Saturday when the bank is having an auction on the steps of their waterfront property.

Saturday, May 19, 2012

CLAIRE:

There's a whole subcategory of movies that my mom likes to call "uplifting." The typical trademark of these movies is an hour and a half of tragedy, death, and misery, followed by about three minutes of pure joy and redemption. Think: George Bailey's impromptu party at the end of "It's a Wonderful Life," or the brand new puppy running through a field at the end of "Old Yeller."