Thursday, May 21, 2015
     

Michael Edward O'Donnell, Ph.D, former Jim Thorpe resident, will hold a book signing of his most recent book, "O'D II: Life's Lessons You don't need a reason to help someone," at the Dimmick Memorial Library from 1 to 3 p.m. Friday.

O'Donnell is a longtime member of the faculty and administration at Clinch Valley College/University of Virginia and a 1960 graduate of Jim Thorpe Area High School.

His first book, "O'D: A Memoir Fifty Years of Teaching and Travel," was published in 2014. A third work is currently in progress.

Michael Edward O'Donnell, Ph.D, former Jim Thorpe resident, will hold a book signing of his most recent book, "O'D II: Life's Lessons You don't need a reason to help someone," at the Dimmick Memorial Library from 1 to 3 p.m. Friday.

O'Donnell is a longtime member of the faculty and administration at Clinch Valley College/University of Virginia and a 1960 graduate of Jim Thorpe Area High School.

His first book, "O'D: A Memoir Fifty Years of Teaching and Travel," was published in 2014. A third work is currently in progress.

Norman Krepshaw
Norman Krepshaw, a resident at Heritage Hill Senior Community, is celebrating his 96th birthday. He was born on May 20, 1919, in Shamokin. When he turned 13 he left school to work in the local coal mines. In his teenage years he met the love of his life, Mary Louise Fry. On Jan. 2, 1940, they were married in St. Joseph's Church in Shamokin. They were married for 72 years until her passing in May 2012.

Q. A friend who uses a lot of psychobabble described a new woman in our retirement community as having a "personality disorder." I would call this woman a pain in the neck. What's the difference between a personality disorder and just a lousy personality?

People with a personality disorder are more than just pains in the neck. They have serious trouble getting along with others. They are usually rigid and unable to adapt to the changes life presents to all of us. They simply don't function well in society.

Q. I've heard the worst pain you can experience is from passing a kidney stone. True?

I had a friend who served in the Royal Air Force in World War II. On a bombing run over Germany, his co-pilot started to pass a kidney stone.

The pain was so bad that the poor guy wanted to jump out of the plane. He had to be knocked unconscious.

Kidney stones have been inflicting extreme pain for at least 7,000 years; evidence of them was found in an Egyptian mummy.

Q. I suffer from hemorrhoids and I suspect a lot of other people do, too, because I see a lot of remedies in drugstores. But this is not a topic you bring up at parties. How many people have hemorrhoids, anyway?

By the age of 50, about half of the population both men and women have hemorrhoids. However, not everyone suffers from the nasty symptoms hemorrhoids can inflict.

Hemorrhoids are inflamed and swollen veins around the anus (external) or in the lower rectum (internal).

Q. I may have to undergo bypass surgery and I heard that it can really mess up your mind. Is that true?

If you have coronary bypass surgery, you could suffer from what some in the health care professions call "pump head."

During traditional surgery, a patient is put on a heart-lung bypass pump to oxygenate and circulate blood. This machine may create clots that could harm the brain. In addition, a surgeon handling the aorta the main heart artery can free bits of accumulated plaque and they can block blood vessels in the brain.

Unofficial start of summer

This weekend is the unofficial launch of the summer season. QVC's resident foodie, David Venable, has several recipes to help you get the summer off to a tasty start.

Grilled Chicken Breast with Pico de Gallo

Serves 4

Pico de Gallo:

4 ripe plum tomatoes, seeded and finely chopped

1 small white onion, finely chopped

1/2 cup loosely packed cilantro leaves, chopped

1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and finely chopped

1 1/2 tablespoon lime juice

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon pepper

Chicken:

This April 13, 2015 photo shows herb compound from left, steak, citrus and herb butter in Concord, N.H. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

It's summer and your grill is about to go into overdrive. At the start of the season you'll probably be content to cook up perfectly seared, but otherwise unadorned steaks, chops and portobello mushrooms. A few weeks down the road, you may want to dress them up a little bit. Flavored butters do the trick beautifully.

AP PHOTO Grilled red onions and shishito peppers with peanut sauce.

Much as I love my grill for the low-and-slow magic it works with a monster hunk of pork butt or a thick, beefy steak, I find it often shines brightest on more tender fare, such as peppers, corn and mushrooms.

Soft produce such as these blister and brown so nicely under the intense heat of the grill. They absorb the flavors of the smoke and char, and transform from something raw and watery to a savory and robust treat. So to kick off grilling season, I created a simple and fast grilled vegetable dish that would play up the smoke and char.

AP Photo/Matthew Mead Mother's Day tea sandwiches.

Some moms want a spa day. Some moms crave chocolate. And some moms just want a little fancy pampering.

If your mom falls into that last category, consider throwing her a tea party this Mother's Day.

And it's so much easier than it sounds.

Brew up some of her favorite teas. Purchase some high-quality sweets some beautiful candies and chocolates, as well as some delicate cakes are ideal.

True to the tea party theme, everything should be small. So if you can't find small pastries, get some that are easily cut and divided.