Tuesday, September 2, 2014
     
Mr. and Mrs. James Wentz

Mr. and Mrs. James Wentz of Lehighton are celebrating their 60th wedding anniversary.

They were married in Zion United Church of Christ on Aug. 28, 1954, by the Rev. Alton Leister.

Mrs. Wentz is the former Shirley Hill, daughter of the late Robert and Geraldine Clay Hill of Lehighton. Mr. Wentz is the son of the late William and Beatrice Shellhammer Wentz of Parryville.

They have four children: Garry, Gregory and Scott, who is married to Patricia, all of Parryville, and Sherryl Armbruster of Lehighton.

They have six grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren....

Caitlyn N. Ruch and John T. Pilla, both of Andreas.

Megan L. Ingraham, Tamaqua, and Kyle M. Berezwick, Mahanoy Plane.

Trisha Marie Sockwell, and Kevin M. Rehrig, both of Tamaqua.

Mr. and Mrs. James Wentz
Mr. and Mrs. James Wentz of Lehighton are celebrating their 60th wedding anniversary. They were married in Zion United Church of Christ on Aug. 28, 1954, by the Rev. Alton Leister. Mrs. Wentz is the former Shirley Hill, daughter of the late Robert and Geraldine Clay Hill of Lehighton. Mr. Wentz is the son of the late William and Beatrice Shellhammer Wentz of Parryville. They have four children: Garry, Gregory and Scott, who is married to Patricia, all of Parryville, and Sherryl Armbruster of Lehighton. They have six grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.

Q. I'm a Baby Boomer who still loves rock concerts, but sometimes I worry if the noise is hurting my old ears.

Sound volume is measured in decibels. You risk hearing loss when you are exposed to sounds at 85 dBs or more. The louder the sound and the longer the exposure, the greater the risk.

Here's the bad news: rock music is on many lists as an example of a dangerous sound. Here's one of those lists:

30 dB = library

50 dB = rain

60 dB = conversation (apolitical)

70 dB = vacuum cleaner

80 dB = busy street

90 dB = shop tools

Q. What is acetaminophen and why do I see it listed on so many products in my medicine cabinet?

Acetaminophen is the most widely used pain-reliever and fever-reducer in the world. It is contained in more than 100 products. Tylenol is the best known over-the-counter acetaminophen product.

It is also a component of well-known prescription drugs such as Darvocet and Percocet. Acetaminophen also is known as paracetamol and N-acetyl-p-aminophenol.

Q. I'm 70 and I'm starting to see a blurred area in the middle of my vision. Any ideas?

Have this checked immediately by an eye care practitioner. What you describe is a symptom of age-related macular degeneration, a leading cause of vision loss in Americans 60 years of age and older.

The macula is at the center of the retina in the back of your eye. The retina transmits light from the eye to the brain. The macula allows us to perform tasks that require central vision such as reading and driving.

Q. I'm 68 and thinking of taking testosterone. Will it help me to feel younger?

There is some controversy about whether testosterone therapy should be used in men who have naturally lower testosterone levels because of aging. It remains unclear whether restoring earlier testosterone levels benefits older men.

For example, studies found that healthy men who took testosterone medications got bigger muscles, but in most studies the men weren't stronger. And, if you suffer from erectile dysfunction, taking testosterone may not relieve your condition.

This July 21, 2014 photo shows grilled chicken paillard with peach and arugula salad in Concord, N.H. Chicken paillard serves as an alternative summer dish that is light, refreshing and substantial. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

Labor Day, summer's last hurrah, is a feast day. And mostly Tell the truth! we tend to overdo it. Ribs, steaks, burgers and hot dogs? Check, check, check and check!

Vegetables and other light fare? Not so much. The standard routine amounts to the summer version of Thanksgiving, except that after the meal everyone collapses onto the lawn rather than a couch.

The 27th annual Times News Cookbook and Recipe Contest is underway!

This year, after serious consideration, we decided to move the annual contest to the fall in order to focus on the fun and food that surround the holidays and take advantage of the great recipes our local cooks stir up over this festive season.

Recipes will be accepted until 11:59 p.m. Oct. 5 and the cookbook will be included in the Nov. 6 issue of the Times News.

Every entrant will receive a special gift. The winners in each category will win some terrific prizes, as will the grand prize winner.

This June 30, 2014 photo shows spicy sweet tomato jam grilled cheese in Concord, N.H. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

Slice 'em and salt 'em.

That's really all a seasonally delicious tomato needs. Though if you really want to gussy it up, you could add a bit of pepper, a splash of olive oil, maybe a sprinkle of balsamic vinegar.

Just enough of each to highlight the sweetly acidic flavor of the juicy tomato flesh.

Still, summer tends to bring an abundance of tomatoes, and after a while we find ourselves hankering for something with a little more oomph. And a salad just isn't cutting it.

This June 30, 2014 photo shows cheesy zucchini salsa in Concord, N.H. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

Zucchini bread is fine and all, but when you're staring down a mountain of summer abundance, how much of it can you really eat?

Convinced we could find more – and more creative – ways to use up a bounty of zucchini, we decided to explore out-of-the-box ideas for summer's most notorious love-hate vegetable. The result? Some delicious ideas that will have you if not embracing then at least better tolerating your zucchini.

10 Fresh ways with zucchini