Sunday, August 2, 2015
     
Cole Leroy Woodward

WOODWARD A son, Cole Leroy Woodward, was born at 11:52 a.m. July 10, 2015, in Allentown, at Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network, to Jennifer and Steven Woodward of Andreas.

He weighed 6 pounds, 13 ounces, and measured 20 inches long.

Maternal grandparents are Dale Troxell of Andreas and the late Cindy Troxell.

Paternal grandparents are Donald and Marlene Woodward of Lehighton.

Cole Leroy Woodward

WOODWARD A son, Cole Leroy Woodward, was born at 11:52 a.m. July 10, 2015, in Allentown, at Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network, to Jennifer and Steven Woodward of Andreas.

He weighed 6 pounds, 13 ounces, and measured 20 inches long.

Maternal grandparents are Dale Troxell of Andreas and the late Cindy Troxell.

Paternal grandparents are Donald and Marlene Woodward of Lehighton.

Olivia Rebert-Blake and Daniel Blake
Olivia Rebert of Glenville, daughter of Holly Seymore and Brian Seymore of Spring Grove, and Steven Rebert of Hanover, and Daniel Blake, also of Glenville, son of Judith and Gary Blake of Summit Hill, were united in marriage on April 11, 2015, in Gettysburg. The Rev. Judith Gausch officiated the double ring ceremony. Given in marriage by her father, Steven Rebert, the bride chose Emily Rebert to be her matron of honor. Her attendants included Kimberly Price, bridesmaid, and Benjamin Long, bridesman. The bridegroom chose Patrick Blake as his best man.

Q. Do people who are colorblind see everything in black and white?

"Colorblindness" is the common term used to describe color vision deficiency. The term is misleading, because total colorblindness that turns the world into shades of gray is rare.

The most common type of colorblindness makes it difficult for people to discriminate between red and green. The next most common form of the deficiency affects the perception of blues and yellows. Those with blue-yellow blindness almost always have red-green blindness, too.

Q. What exactly is a "charley horse" and why do I get them in my legs at night?

According to the American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms, the term "charley horse" was first used in the 1880s by baseball players to describe a muscle cramp.

No one knows the true origin, but the dictionary says: "Among the more likely theories proposed is that it alludes to the name of either a horse or an afflicted ballplayer who limped like one of the elderly draft horses formerly employed to drag the infield."

Q. I had a bad cold so I asked my doctor for an antibiotic. He seemed reluctant, but I insisted and he gave me the prescription. I was supposed to take it for 10 days, but I stopped after seven because I felt better and I ...

Stop! Next you'll tell me you prefer not to cover your mouth when you cough.

Taking antibiotics unnecessarily and not completing your prescription are the leading causes of "superbugs," bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics. These superbugs are one of the most serious threats to global public health.

Q. What's the difference between a CT scan and an MRI?

The CT scan, MRI and others are known as diagnostic-imaging tests.

Let's go over the common ones.

X-ray

One of the oldest forms of medical imaging, an X-ray examination uses electromagnetic radiation to make pictures.

An X-ray machine passes a beam through your body and records an image digitally or on film. Body tissues produce different results. Tissues show up in shades of gray. Bones look white. Lungs that contain air appear dark.

This June 22, 2015 photo shows weekend lemon chicken diner in a bag in Concord, N.H. Chicken legs and thighs are luscious in texture and full of flavor and protein. They also are much lower in saturated fat than most cuts of red meat, and they offer more iron per serving than chicken breasts. This dish is from a recipe by Melissa d‡-Arabian. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

Life is busy. We don't always have the luxury of thumbing through our favorite cookbooks, marking appealing recipes with sticky notes for dinners sometime off in the future when we will somehow have time to salt-cure a cod or dry-age a side of beef in our garage fridge.

Sometimes, we just need to get dinner on the table. It doesn't have to be fancy, but it should still be tasty and nutritious.

Enter the chicken leg and thigh!

This July 13, 2015 photo shows grilled gochujang chicken thighs with feta and fresh mint in Concord, N.H. The gochujang has kick, but doesn't overwhelm, being both salty and savory with a touch of sweetness. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

For many years, I was hooked on Thai red curry paste, a thick, unctuous seasoning that packs a little heat and a lot of savory deliciousness. It's great whisked into vinaigrettes and marinades, smeared straight up onto steaks and chicken, blended into meatloaf and burgers, even pureed into hummus.

Fresh  blueberries

July marks National Blueberry Month and this year marks 100 years since the first blueberries were commercially sold out of Whitesbog, New Jersey.

Today, blueberries offer a wide variety of beneficial properties, in addition to being sweet treats for warm summer days.

They are not only a staple in the White House kitchen garden, but on chefs' and celebrities' plates around the country.

AP Photo/Matthew Mead Chickpea Crust Pizza Margherita is ready for the oven.

If there's a more basic and universally loved dish than pizza, I can't name it. Bread, cheese and tomatoes ... Perfect!

Unless, that is, you're one of those poor souls who is sensitive to gluten.

Happily, here's a pizza that swaps out the traditional Italian wheat-based crust for a chickpea "flour" crust that's popular in many parts of the world. And it's just in time for the start of tomato season.