Saturday, July 4, 2015
     
Connie Biederman

Connie L. Biederman, a resident of Heritage Hill Senior Community in Weatherly, recentlycelebrated her 91st birthday.

Born in Philadelphia on July 1, 1924, she is the daughter of the late Charles and Leona Oettle.

Connie graduated from the Philadelphia High School for girls in 1942.

Following graduation she went to work at theFederal Reserve Bank in Philadelphia, where she worked for 37 years. She started as a file clerk and later became assistantcoordinator.

She married the love of her life, Fred Biederman, in 1948.

TIMES NEWS FILE PHOTO Winning a blue ribbon at the Carbon County Fair is becoming a family tradition.

For many, displaying at the Carbon County Fair has become a family tradition.

Since its inception, exhibits have more than tripled says Kristin Simmons, superintendent of the still exhibits at the fair.

In addition to displays of fruits, nuts, wines, flowers, honey, vegetables, and homemade cakes, and goodies, as well as the livestock, attract families year after year.

Connie Biederman
Connie L. Biederman, a resident of Heritage Hill Senior Community in Weatherly, recentlycelebrated her 91st birthday. Born in Philadelphia on July 1, 1924, she is the daughter of the late Charles and Leona Oettle. Connie graduated from the Philadelphia High School for girls in 1942. Following graduation she went to work at theFederal Reserve Bank in Philadelphia, where she worked for 37 years. She started as a file clerk and later became assistantcoordinator. She married the love of her life, Fred Biederman, in 1948.

Q. What's the difference between a CT scan and an MRI?

The CT scan, MRI and others are known as diagnostic-imaging tests.

Let's go over the common ones.

X-ray

One of the oldest forms of medical imaging, an X-ray examination uses electromagnetic radiation to make pictures.

An X-ray machine passes a beam through your body and records an image digitally or on film. Body tissues produce different results. Tissues show up in shades of gray. Bones look white. Lungs that contain air appear dark.

Q. My doctor put his stethoscope on my neck and muttered to himself, "no brooey." I'm not the type to ask the doctor questions, but I'm still wondering what he meant by that. My spelling is probably wrong.

Your doctor was checking your carotid arteries on the sides of your neck to see if the blood flow to your brain was blocked. If one of the arteries was blocked, it would make a "swoosh" that the medical profession calls a bruit. Your phonetic spelling is excellent. Bruit is pronounced "BROO-ee" like "phooey."

Q. I had a bird's nest in my chimney and was told that we were probably getting some carbon monoxide in the house. He said that this is bad for your health. How bad?

Carbon monoxide (chemical symbol CO) is a colorless and odorless gas that can kill you. CO is a byproduct of combustion. It comes out of car tailpipes, gas ovens, fireplaces and heating systems.

That bird's nest was blocking the evacuation of CO out of your chimney from your furnace and hot-water heater. The gas was backing up into your house.

Q. Isn't a fractured bone less serious than a broken bone?

This is a common misconception. A fracture and a break are the same thing.

For several reasons, seniors are in danger of breaking a bone. As we age, the power of our senses, reflexes and coordination diminishes.

Maladies and the medicines we take for them can contribute to balance problems, which can lead to falls. Then there's osteoporosis a disease that makes bones more likely to snap.

This June 8, 2015 photo shows raspberry rhubarb cream pie with oatmeal crust in Concord, N.H. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

A basic strawberry rhubarb pie is a delightful and iconic part of summer, but why let it rest at that?

This summer we decided to crank it up and take this pie to a whole new level. We started by ditching the usual cooked strawberries in favor of fresh raspberries. The raspberries get arranged over a simple but deliciously tart-sweet rhubarb compote.

And we didn't stop there. We layered all of that over a vanilla pudding, giving us the best of two worlds fruit pie and cream pie.

This June 8, 2015 photo shows grilled pineapple fruit salad in Concord, N.H. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

Want an easy way to add a little punch to your otherwise humdrum fruit salad? Just add some heat.

In this case, we tossed pineapple rings on the grill for just 4 to 5 minutes per side. The intense heat of the flames caramelizes the natural sugars of the pineapple and adds a smoky char. Once the pineapple rings come off the grill and cool a bit, they can be chopped and tossed with all the usual fruit salad suspects.

This June 8, 2015 photo shows bratwurst grinders with apple, cheddar and sauerkraut in Concord, N.H. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

Anybody can grill a hot dog, slap it on a bun and dump on the usual ketchup and mustard.

So how about going a bit beyond the ordinary this July Fourth?

Rather than your basic dog, up the ante by grilling up bratwurst sausages or peppery kielbasas. They are bigger, meatier and way more flavorful.

For toppings, we went decidely German, filling our buns with sauerkraut, cheese and sautéed apple.

Bratwurst grinders with apple, cheddar and sauerkraut

1 tablespoon caraway seeds

1 large apple, peeled, cored and diced

1 teaspoon sugar

This recipe is what would happen if your favorite deviled eggs hooked up with a sinfully delicious potato salad.

Rich, creamy, tangy, eggy and starchy, this is everything you want in a July Fourth side salad.

This also happens to be a lovely do-ahead recipe. In fact, we highly recommend you prep it the day before to give the flavors more time to marry.

Just hold off on the smoked paprika garnish until just before serving.