Sunday, April 26, 2015
     
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Getz Sr.

Richard and Barbara Getz Sr. of Palmerton recently celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.

They were married on April 10, 1965, at St. Matthew's Church in Kunkletown by the Rev. Aiden Bohner.

Mrs. Getz is the daughter of the late Vane and Alma (Costenbader) Smale of Kresgeville. Her husband is the son of the late Walter and Elsie (Hittner) Getz of Franklin Township.

They have two children: A daughter, Sherry, wife of Louis Smith of Lehighton, and a son, Richard Jr., husband of Yvette, of Palmerton.

LISA PRICE/TIMES NEWS Kristen Rosser with a "before" goat.

Turns out we're not the only ones fairly bleating with happiness as we rid ourselves of winter outerwear.

Just ask a goat. No kidding. Professional shearer Kristen Rosser stopped in at the Holly Road Fiber Farm, Barnesville, operated by Frank and Cathy Riotto, to trim the fleeces from their mohair goats.

She's a professional what? You can just imagine that conversation.

"Mom, Dad? Thanks for supporting me while I pursued that art major degree, but I've decided to become a shearer."

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Getz Sr.
Richard and Barbara Getz Sr. of Palmerton recently celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary. They were married on April 10, 1965, at St. Matthew's Church in Kunkletown by the Rev. Aiden Bohner. Mrs. Getz is the daughter of the late Vane and Alma (Costenbader) Smale of Kresgeville. Her husband is the son of the late Walter and Elsie (Hittner) Getz of Franklin Township. They have two children: A daughter, Sherry, wife of Louis Smith of Lehighton, and a son, Richard Jr., husband of Yvette, of Palmerton.

This is the last installment of a three-part series on breast cancer.

Breast cancer strikes most often when men are in their sixties.

Male breast cancer? Men do have breast cells that can become cancerous. The disease is uncommon in men. It represents only 1 percent of all breast cancers. Because of its rarity, many men aren't aware it exists. And that's a problem.

For unknown reasons, the incidence of male breast cancer has been increasing. About 2,000 men in the U.S. are diagnosed with breast cancer annually.

(This is the second installment of a three-part series on breast cancer.)

The most common breast cancer symptom is a lump. Other symptoms include swelling, skin irritation, nipple pain or retraction and an unusual discharge.

Early diagnosis saves lives. The combination of a mammogram, a clinical breast exam and self-exams is recommended by healthcare experts to reduce breast-cancer deaths.

A mammogram is a breast x-ray. If mammography finds an abnormality, confirmation by biopsy is required. In a biopsy, a tissue sample is taken for analysis.

(This is the first installment in a three-part series on breast cancer)

Breast cancer is second behind lung cancer as the leading cause of cancer death in women. The chance of developing invasive breast cancer at some time in a woman's life is about 1 in 8.

The female breast is composed primarily of milk-producing glands (lobules), ducts that connect the glands to the nipple, and soft tissue. Breast cancer is a malignant tumor that has grown from breast cells.

Bursitis occurs more often as we get older.

Repetitive motions are the worst things for people who tend to get bursitis. Other causes include joint trauma, rheumatoid arthritis, gout and infection.

Bursitis is inflammation of a bursa, which is a small sac filled with fluid. We each have about 160 of these bursae, which act as shock absorbers and grease for our joints. They are buffers between bones and overlapping muscles or between bones and tendons/skin. When bursae become inflamed, they can ache.

AP Photo/Matthew Mead Mason jars provide a twist for this satisfying seven-layer salad.

Too often, a salad is served out of obligation. We feel it is something we have to do to make the meal complete, but really don't want to.

And too often that's why the salads we serve aren't all that great. We don't really care about them. Thing is, I love a well-made salad, and for me it is no obligation to either serve or eat one. This salad, for example, a seven-layer creation built in a canning jar. I love how they look. I love how they taste. I even like the process of assembling them.

AP Photo/Matthew Mead Homemade vinaigrette dressing really is worth the effort.

Most people reach for prepared salad dressings because they just can't handle the thought of whipping up yet something else.

But homemade dressings are so much better, they really are worth the trouble. In just five minutes you can prep one big batch of dressing for the entire week.

So let's walk through the basics of vinaigrettes.

The standard recipe for a vinegar-based dressing calls for a 3-to-1 ratio of oil to vinegar (or other acid). But really that's just a starting point.

BOB FORD/TIMES NEWS Amy Daderko Alexander dumps a mound of dough onto the work bench for kneading and separating into individually weighed balls.

It was the late Mary Matrician's recipe that started a tradition in the Panther Valley that's been going on since the early 1950s.

In the weeks preceding Easter members of Lansford's Saint Nicholas Orthodox Church gather in the basement to make Paska bread.

Back when they first started, Matrician, who was an active member of the parish, and fellow volunteers would make 25 loaves.

About 25 years ago, Helen Neifert took over the operation and doubled that. Eventually, she doubled it again, to 100 loaves in a day.

AP Photo/Matthew Mead Welcome spring with Brown Butter Asparagus with Pecans.

Remember the days when you knew spring was coming by the arrival of asparagus at the grocer?

These days, fresh asparagus is available almost all year. But still, my heart leaps with joy the first moment I see asparagus for less than $3 a pound. Then it is officially spring!

When asparagus is in season, I buy it weekly, both because it's so cheap and because it's incredibly versatile.