Friday, August 28, 2015
     
Jeannie Carl pops her freshly made soap from the mold.

Do-it-yourself may appear to be a new trend, but according to those who do it themselves, the idea is nothing new.

DIY is everywhere, from home renovations to clothing and jewelry-making, right down to soap and cosmetics.

Jeannie Carl and Selena Mazmanian, both of Jim Thorpe, became soap makers a number of years ago.

“I was at a Women and the Outdoors conference one summer eight years ago,” said Carl. “I signed up for an archery workshop, but all that was available was soap making.”

Jeannie Carl pops her freshly made soap from the mold.

Do-it-yourself may appear to be a new trend, but according to those who do it themselves, the idea is nothing new.

DIY is everywhere, from home renovations to clothing and jewelry-making, right down to soap and cosmetics.

Jeannie Carl and Selena Mazmanian, both of Jim Thorpe, became soap makers a number of years ago.

“I was at a Women and the Outdoors conference one summer eight years ago,” said Carl. “I signed up for an archery workshop, but all that was available was soap making.”

Palmerton High School Class of 1985 will hold its 30-year class reunion from 6 to 11 p.m. Oct. 10 at the Sokol Hall in Palmerton. Tickets are $30, and include dinner, beer, beverages, and entertainment. Bring your own bottle. Mail checks payable to "PHS Class of 85" to Lori Haydt, 1240 Trachsville Hill Road, Kunkletown, PA 18058. Payment is due Sept. 1. For more information, call Steph Anderson at 610-597-0405.

Q. I seem to get more cavities in my teeth as I get older. Is this another part of the aging process?

Tooth decay and gum disease are caused by plaque, a layer of bacteria. This plaque can build up quickly on the teeth of older people. In addition, seniors have a greater tendency to get decay around older fillings. And we have more fillings than younger people because we didn't all grow up with fluoride.

Q. I've been getting bruises lately and I can't remember hurting myself. Should I see a doctor?

A tendency to bruise easily is common when you age. It's especially common among women.

A bruise also known as a contusion occurs when the tiny blood vessels under your skin break after being struck.

When you bruise, the blood leaks under the skin and leaves a black-and-blue mark. The harder the impact, the bigger the bruise.

As the blood is reabsorbed by your body, the bruise goes away.

Q. Do people who are colorblind see everything in black and white?

"Colorblindness" is the common term used to describe color vision deficiency. The term is misleading, because total colorblindness that turns the world into shades of gray is rare.

The most common type of colorblindness makes it difficult for people to discriminate between red and green. The next most common form of the deficiency affects the perception of blues and yellows. Those with blue-yellow blindness almost always have red-green blindness, too.

Q. What exactly is a "charley horse" and why do I get them in my legs at night?

According to the American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms, the term "charley horse" was first used in the 1880s by baseball players to describe a muscle cramp.

No one knows the true origin, but the dictionary says: "Among the more likely theories proposed is that it alludes to the name of either a horse or an afflicted ballplayer who limped like one of the elderly draft horses formerly employed to drag the infield."

Dave Fuller of Mahoning Township is purchasing fresh vegetables from A+ Produce owners Avery Oprey and Amber Coleman.

August is Pennsylvania's produce month and midsummer is the perfect time to stock up on fresh farm-to-table tasty treats.

The support for local and small business has grown over the years, with so many Americans looking to change to a healthy lifestyle many residents have turned to their local farm stands to provide veggies and fruits at reasonable prices.

In-season vegetables such as sweet corn, tomatoes and squash are summer backyard barbecue staples.

August is Pennsylvania Produce Month.

If you're interested in eating locally grown foods, there's no time like the present.

According to the Pennsylvania Vegetable Marketing and Research Program, Pennsylvania's 3,950 vegetable growers plant 49,400 acres to produce more than 280,000 tons of vegetables for fresh and processing use.

Sweet corn is Pennsylvania's largest vegetable crop.

Growers plant about 14,700 acres per year ranking the state as the seventh largest producer of fresh market sweet corn.

This July 13, 2015 photo shows a soft shell crab before breading in Concord, N.H. This dish is from a recipe by Sara Moulton. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

The first time I tasted soft-shell crabs I was a little girl attending the 1964 New York World's Fair. Looking back, I don't know where I found the courage.

Not only wasn't I a fan of seafood or shellfish, but this weird new item looked like a giant spider. Let's say, then, that I closed my eyes before I took a bite. Wow! Crispy and sweet, that soft-shell crab was one of the best things I'd ever eaten.

I have loved them ever since and make a point of preparing them every year when they come into season between late spring and early fall.

This June 22, 2015 photo shows weekend lemon chicken diner in a bag in Concord, N.H. Chicken legs and thighs are luscious in texture and full of flavor and protein. They also are much lower in saturated fat than most cuts of red meat, and they offer more iron per serving than chicken breasts. This dish is from a recipe by Melissa d‡-Arabian. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

Life is busy. We don't always have the luxury of thumbing through our favorite cookbooks, marking appealing recipes with sticky notes for dinners sometime off in the future when we will somehow have time to salt-cure a cod or dry-age a side of beef in our garage fridge.

Sometimes, we just need to get dinner on the table. It doesn't have to be fancy, but it should still be tasty and nutritious.

Enter the chicken leg and thigh!