Tuesday, July 28, 2015
     
AP GRAPHIC

WASHINGTON – Older women with mild memory impairment worsened about twice as fast as men, says new research that illustrates the especially hard toll that Alzheimer's takes on women.

Nearly two-thirds of Americans with Alzheimer's are women.

At age 65, seemingly healthy women have about a 1 in 6 chance of developing Alzheimer's during the rest of their lives, compared with a 1 in 11 chance for men. Scientists once thought the disparity was just because women tend to live longer but there's increasing agreement that something else makes women more vulnerable.

AP GRAPHIC

WASHINGTON – Older women with mild memory impairment worsened about twice as fast as men, says new research that illustrates the especially hard toll that Alzheimer's takes on women.

Nearly two-thirds of Americans with Alzheimer's are women.

At age 65, seemingly healthy women have about a 1 in 6 chance of developing Alzheimer's during the rest of their lives, compared with a 1 in 11 chance for men. Scientists once thought the disparity was just because women tend to live longer but there's increasing agreement that something else makes women more vulnerable.

KATHY KUNKEL/TIMES NEWS  Walter Hill of Tamaqua reached the 100-year milestone on July 21, partying with friends and family, including, front, from left: wife Catherine, Walter, great-grandsons Kai and Cove; and back row: Judy and Stan Holloway, Heidi, Zev and Josh Holloway.
Walter N. Hill of Tamaqua celebrated his 100th birthday on July 21 surrounded by family and friends, including a new great-grandson. The party was held in the community room at the Tamaqua Majestic House apartments.

Q. Do people who are colorblind see everything in black and white?

"Colorblindness" is the common term used to describe color vision deficiency. The term is misleading, because total colorblindness that turns the world into shades of gray is rare.

The most common type of colorblindness makes it difficult for people to discriminate between red and green. The next most common form of the deficiency affects the perception of blues and yellows. Those with blue-yellow blindness almost always have red-green blindness, too.

Q. What exactly is a "charley horse" and why do I get them in my legs at night?

According to the American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms, the term "charley horse" was first used in the 1880s by baseball players to describe a muscle cramp.

No one knows the true origin, but the dictionary says: "Among the more likely theories proposed is that it alludes to the name of either a horse or an afflicted ballplayer who limped like one of the elderly draft horses formerly employed to drag the infield."

Q. I had a bad cold so I asked my doctor for an antibiotic. He seemed reluctant, but I insisted and he gave me the prescription. I was supposed to take it for 10 days, but I stopped after seven because I felt better and I ...

Stop! Next you'll tell me you prefer not to cover your mouth when you cough.

Taking antibiotics unnecessarily and not completing your prescription are the leading causes of "superbugs," bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics. These superbugs are one of the most serious threats to global public health.

Q. What's the difference between a CT scan and an MRI?

The CT scan, MRI and others are known as diagnostic-imaging tests.

Let's go over the common ones.

X-ray

One of the oldest forms of medical imaging, an X-ray examination uses electromagnetic radiation to make pictures.

An X-ray machine passes a beam through your body and records an image digitally or on film. Body tissues produce different results. Tissues show up in shades of gray. Bones look white. Lungs that contain air appear dark.

Fresh  blueberries

July marks National Blueberry Month and this year marks 100 years since the first blueberries were commercially sold out of Whitesbog, New Jersey.

Today, blueberries offer a wide variety of beneficial properties, in addition to being sweet treats for warm summer days.

They are not only a staple in the White House kitchen garden, but on chefs' and celebrities' plates around the country.

AP Photo/Matthew Mead Chickpea Crust Pizza Margherita is ready for the oven.

If there's a more basic and universally loved dish than pizza, I can't name it. Bread, cheese and tomatoes ... Perfect!

Unless, that is, you're one of those poor souls who is sensitive to gluten.

Happily, here's a pizza that swaps out the traditional Italian wheat-based crust for a chickpea "flour" crust that's popular in many parts of the world. And it's just in time for the start of tomato season.

Chocolatly Chip Ice Cream Sandwich Pops

If you love ice cream, it doesn't matter what time of year it is, you'll eat it.

But when it's hot and humid, and you want something to cool off your inside, if not your outside, then it's got to be ice cream.

And homemade ice cream treats? Even better.

These recipes from QVC's David Venable are just too tempting.

Peaches and cream

This June 8, 2015 photo shows raspberry rhubarb cream pie with oatmeal crust in Concord, N.H. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

A basic strawberry rhubarb pie is a delightful and iconic part of summer, but why let it rest at that?

This summer we decided to crank it up and take this pie to a whole new level. We started by ditching the usual cooked strawberries in favor of fresh raspberries. The raspberries get arranged over a simple but deliciously tart-sweet rhubarb compote.

And we didn't stop there. We layered all of that over a vanilla pudding, giving us the best of two worlds fruit pie and cream pie.