Mahoning Township Supervisors heard complaints from Nis Hollow Estates residents Wednesday night about undrinkable water, sewage on the open ground in one of the lots, dilapidated buildings and unsafe conditions.

They also told supervisors multiple calls to Morgan Management Company in New York and the Park Manager Christine Green have been ignored.

"We call Morgan Management Company and try to complain about the conditions and they hang up on us," said resident Rosetta Strohl. "The park manager doesn't answer us."

Strohl said that lot 29's owner Walt Sharpley wanted to be there, but he had to care for his grandchildren.

"He has human waste all over his lot since January from a sewage backup," Strohl said.

A resident who wasn't identified, but said he lived there for 35 years, said the park is plagued with water problems as well.

"We have had no water several times. The water smells and isn't fit to drink. We bring in bottled water," the resident said.

He said there are two wells on the estate.

"We don't think the development is servicing the system properly."

He also said the roads are not taken care of and that during the winter a hospital van overturned at the bottom of a hill.Strohl said the poles have no lot numbers and emergency vehicles cannot find their way in the park and have stopped for directions.

Another resident complained about the garbage strewn along the road to the sewage plant.

"There are oil cans, gas cans and garbage all over the sides of the road. It will be a fire hazard as it gets warmer."

Strohl also told supervisors about the pond not being fenced. She said it was deep and a nuisance to the children who play near it. She was worried that someone could drown in the pond.

Resident Donna Keiper told supervisors the children also climb on a downed tree near the bridge by the road. The tree is also resting in the pond. She was afraid someone would get hurt by falling off the tree into the water.

"It has been there since Hurricane Sandy knocked it down. The manager claims it's Mahoning Township's responsibility to clean it up."

Supervisor Bruce Steigerwalt said he didn't think the tree was on township property because of where it is located.

Solicitor Tom Nanovic asked if the tree might be in the township right of way, but Steigerwalt said he wasn't sure.

Keiper and Strohl both discussed the conditions of the collapsed building and breezeway attached to the office that is a hazard in their opinion. Keiper said,

"I'm very concerned about the unsafe nature of this building."

Supervisor Frank Ruch said he was not sure if the township had a code to enforce dealing with demolishing a collapsed building.

"I don't know what we can do to force someone to clean up a building when they fall down," Ruch said.

Building inspector Carl Faust forwarded a letter to supervisors regarding the conditions of the dilapidated building and Keiper implored them to send the letter to the management company. Ruch made a motion to send the enforcement letter and the motion carried 4-0. Supervisor Kerry Verrastro was absent from the meeting.

The supervisors did offer some steps to the residents to begin dealing with the problems.

Ruch told them the water and sewage issues should be reported to the Department of Environmental Protection. Steigerwalt gave them the phone number for DEP and recommended they call as soon as possible.

He said the number is an emergency number so they might even be able to talk with someone that evening.

Steigerwalt told them both the water system and sewage system are licensed systems and DEP should be checking both systems regularly.

Supervisor John Wieczorek asked secretary Natalie Haggerty to furnish them with a complaint form.

"If you could list the complaints you made to us on the form, we can formally take action where we are able."

He said the board would also forward it to DEP to notify it as well as making sure the appropriate enforcement officials receive the information.

Strohl said they would assemble the list and get it to the supervisors as soon as possible.