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Presentation given on lost village

  • SPECIAL TO THE TIMES NEWS Vice president Mark Gilkeson, left; and Joe Roman, right; present a certificate of appreciation to Bob Dunstan to thank him for his presentation.
    SPECIAL TO THE TIMES NEWS Vice president Mark Gilkeson, left; and Joe Roman, right; present a certificate of appreciation to Bob Dunstan to thank him for his presentation.
Published April 30. 2015 05:19AM

Nesquehoning Historical Society recently learned about the lost village of Lausanne, which was formerly located between Nesquehoning and what was then Mauch Chunk.

The presentation was given by Bob Dunstan.

The story of Lausanne began in 1786 when Jacob Weiss built the Union Saw Mill near the point at which the Nesquehoning Creek runs into the Lehigh.

By 1804, the growing village included a stop for travelers called the "Landing Tavern." This tavern was one of the first way stations to be built in that area of the upper Lehigh wilderness. The tavern had stables, a store and sleeping quarters. Abram Klotz was the landlord until 1817.

Also beginning in 1804, a pioneer entrepreneur by the name of Mr. Trumbull started shipping bagged coal out from Rhume Run also know as "Room Run" in Nesquehoning.

In 1806, several hundred bushels were shipped to Philadelphia.

By August 1814, four large barges of Room Run coal were shipped through Lausanne. The village served as a crossroads for the Lehigh-Susquehanna Turnpike and also for the Easton-Berwick Road, which later became Route 93. These roads were used for the shipment of grain and anthracite coal between Wilkes-Barre, Nesquehoning and Philadelphia.

Josiah White was considering buying the town of Lausanne at a public sale in 1830, but he thought that the auction was priced too high.

Instead of buying Lausanne, he decided to move just a short distance up the Lehigh to Mauch Chunk. There he started his own distribution center, which eventually came to be known as the Lehigh Coal and Navigation Company.

In the fall of 1830, Nesquehoning was laid out. Sadly, by this time, the lost village of Lausanne was already falling into disuse as the canals and railroads bypassed it.

There were also several floods that leveled the town, so there was little incentive to rebuild.

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