Friday, July 11, 2014
     

Fitness Master

Saturday, May 22, 2010

Thirty-five years ago, most in the medical field felt there were two ways to overcome heart disease: drugs and surgery.

Doctor Dean Ornish was not like most.

Saturday, May 15, 2010

"You are what you eat" is a frequently used saying to establish the importance of diet in all facets of living. But if the theory proposed by a company called Interleukin Genetics Inc. is right, that saying will change a bit.

People will now say, "You are, so here's what you eat."

Saturday, May 8, 2010

In the last column, I suggested parents should have a conversation with their kids explaining the differences between a "good snack" and a "bad snack" as a way to make the snacking that kids do and should do help rather than hurt overall health.

The creation of such a column was a direct result of troubling research. A study in the March issue of the journal Health Affairs showed that while children ages 2-18 in 2006 averaged fewer calories from meals than in 1977, total calories consumed were up by 100 per day.

Saturday, April 24, 2010

In one segment of Morgan Spurlock's well-known documentary, "Super Size Me," he takes to the streets and asks a number of New York City residents, "What is a calorie?" No one comes close to the proper definition.

Saturday, April 17, 2010

1.) Four fewer hours in the day to exercise.

2.) Four more hours in the day where it's really easy to snack on the sorts of foods that lead to weight gain and hurt your health.

If you were asked why watching television for four hours a day increases your risk of dying, you'd probably cite one or both of the reasons above. Your response would make sense because both contribute, but a recent study done in Australia found something else.

Saturday, April 10, 2010

"The proof is in the pudding" is one of those seemingly clever catchphrases that you might say in the quick give-and-take of conversation. But don't ever write it unless you're compiling a list of the most confusing idioms.

That's because the saying is missing key words.

The original saying, "The proof of the pudding is in the eating," means things are uncertain until tested or in this specific instance tasted, which isn't what most people want to convey when they say the shortened version of the phrase.

Saturday, April 3, 2010

Chris Crowley has the right idea. He doesn't delve, however, into scientific details.

You learned about Crowley in this column last October. He's the guy who went from a lawyer at a prestigious New York City firm to a ski bum to the co-author of two books on aging well, the best-known being Younger Next Year: Live Strong, Fit, and Sexy Until You're 80 and Beyond. As a result, Crowley now spends much of his time speaking to groups of graybeards on how to become "functionally younger."

Saturday, March 27, 2010

I had cleaned up a kid's vomit before, so that wasn't the shock of my Saturday night a few weeks ago.

The shock occurred when we deviated from our tried-and-true plan. Normally when my father and I baby-sit my niece and nephew so that my brother and his wife can go out to eat and catch an early movie, we play at Pop-Pop's until the kids get hungry, and then he takes them out to eat at Arby's or McDonald's.

Saturday, March 20, 2010

If you call the Korean War a draw, the United States has only ever lost one war of any significance: the Vietnam War.

Almost every explanation for how that occurred mentions that civil unrest kept the government from issuing an all-out offensive and that a people fighting for their lives, land, and culture fights far harder than a primarily conscripted force fighting halfway around the world for an abstract idea.

Though I'm no historian, I believe there's another equally important reason for why the U.S. lost the war.

A late start.

Saturday, March 13, 2010

Less than two months ago, a Palmerton Area High School sophomore committed suicide. Word spread through the junior high school the next day, and many who knew the boy agonized over the loss.

This agony seemed to dredge up awful fears and memories in others, creating a classic example of the ripple effect. Tears begot tears, and by midday any attempts at school work were useless.

As kids sat in small groups comforting one another, more than once I heard the question asked.

Why?