Saturday, April 25, 2015
     

Fitness Master

Saturday, August 14, 2010

One of the things I love about writing a health-and-fitness column is reading what could be called out-of-the-blue research. For instance, who would've thought that yawning was a sign of anything other than fatigue or boredom?

But many now believe that the primary function of yawning is to increase alertness and better absorb information by cooling the brain.

Saturday, August 7, 2010

In order to regain the 24 pounds of weight I lost during a rather serious bout of infectious mononucleosis at the start of my junior year in high school a weight gain my doctor decided was essential in order for me to participate in the upcoming basketball season he gave me this advice: End each day by downing a pint of ice cream.

Talk about total teenage bliss. And a potential malpractice suit.

Saturday, July 31, 2010

We prefer fast food. They prefer good food which leads to better health. How else can you interpret the numbers used by Peg Moline, in her Editor's Letter in the June issue of Natural Health?

"The U.S. uses 16 percent of its gross domestic product (GDP) for health care and Americans spend just under 6 percent of their income on food," she writes. "In contrast, Europeans spend as much as 18 percent on food and just 8.6 percent on health care."

Saturday, July 24, 2010

Score one for truth in advertising. Even if the gap between the truth and the ad spanned 19 years.

And the commercial lacked specifics.

The 1991 version of the "Milk, it does a body good" television commercials shows a well-built young man drinking milk and holding a remote. As he tells you that "Milk is sure helping me to get stronger," he plays a video clip of himself from when he started high school and two kids pushed him around, "just because I was smaller."

But then he explains that he has been working out, drinking milk, and developing muscles.

Saturday, July 17, 2010

The original discovery in 2009 was so significant that the researchers all became Nobel Laureates. What they determined was the tiny pieces of DNA at the ends of chromosomes called telomeres had a job similar to aglets, the plastic or metal sheaths at the ends of a shoelace.

In the same way aglets keep laces from fraying as they are pushed through a shoe's eyelets, telomeres keep the active ends of chromosomes from being exposed.

Saturday, July 10, 2010

When I see a lifestyle pattern emerging with the potential to induce a health disaster, I am duty bound to write about it.

Even if it makes me look like a Luddite and to some degree contradicts recent research.

Saturday, June 26, 2010

I'd like to think that each week this column is chocked full of good advice and an equal measure of something else.

Hope.

And because of this, I hope that you come to see your health-and-fitness failings as I see mine: as patterns or habits that can almost always be altered by a combination of information, common sense, and resourcefulness.

Saturday, June 19, 2010

There is no Nutrient Partitioning lobby, so I can't be in their back pocket. It's just that when a weekly health-and-fitness columnist argues for readers to construct their diet around those principles way three times in four weeks that's the conclusion you could reach.

But I had no intention of writing about nutrient partitioning again today. Honestly.

The Dukan Diet made me do it.

Saturday, June 12, 2010

Marcus Aurelius, The Roman emperor better known as a Stoic philosopher, is credited with saying, "It is a wise man that learns one thing from another."

Now that doesn't mean only wise men have the ability to assess one situation and apply it elsewhere. It means you become wise at least momentarily anytime you recognize the similarities in things and act accordingly.

Saturday, June 5, 2010

Generally, researchers are matter-of-fact about results, content to simply present what they have found. So when the principal investigator of a health-related matter says that the logical end result of what she has researched is "like the sky is falling," you know that something serious is wrong.

It's something I warned you about years ago: that children are now developing diseases previously found only in adults.

The best-known example is type 2 diabetes. Only two generations ago, it was officially called adult-onset diabetes.