Tuesday, September 23, 2014
     

Fitness Master

Saturday, June 12, 2010

Marcus Aurelius, The Roman emperor better known as a Stoic philosopher, is credited with saying, "It is a wise man that learns one thing from another."

Now that doesn't mean only wise men have the ability to assess one situation and apply it elsewhere. It means you become wise at least momentarily anytime you recognize the similarities in things and act accordingly.

Saturday, June 5, 2010

Generally, researchers are matter-of-fact about results, content to simply present what they have found. So when the principal investigator of a health-related matter says that the logical end result of what she has researched is "like the sky is falling," you know that something serious is wrong.

It's something I warned you about years ago: that children are now developing diseases previously found only in adults.

The best-known example is type 2 diabetes. Only two generations ago, it was officially called adult-onset diabetes.

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

Sometimes it's hard to believe how the world once was.

For much of the first half of the twentieth century, the public viewed antismoking groups with a sort of What's-the-big-deal? bemusement now reserved to groups just north of the lunatic fringe, like PETA. After all, smoking was portrayed as glamorous, actors and athletes sung its praises in advertisements, and talk about peer pressure close to half of American adults were doing it.

Saturday, May 22, 2010

Thirty-five years ago, most in the medical field felt there were two ways to overcome heart disease: drugs and surgery.

Doctor Dean Ornish was not like most.

Saturday, May 15, 2010

"You are what you eat" is a frequently used saying to establish the importance of diet in all facets of living. But if the theory proposed by a company called Interleukin Genetics Inc. is right, that saying will change a bit.

People will now say, "You are, so here's what you eat."

Saturday, May 8, 2010

In the last column, I suggested parents should have a conversation with their kids explaining the differences between a "good snack" and a "bad snack" as a way to make the snacking that kids do and should do help rather than hurt overall health.

The creation of such a column was a direct result of troubling research. A study in the March issue of the journal Health Affairs showed that while children ages 2-18 in 2006 averaged fewer calories from meals than in 1977, total calories consumed were up by 100 per day.

Saturday, April 24, 2010

In one segment of Morgan Spurlock's well-known documentary, "Super Size Me," he takes to the streets and asks a number of New York City residents, "What is a calorie?" No one comes close to the proper definition.

Saturday, April 17, 2010

1.) Four fewer hours in the day to exercise.

2.) Four more hours in the day where it's really easy to snack on the sorts of foods that lead to weight gain and hurt your health.

If you were asked why watching television for four hours a day increases your risk of dying, you'd probably cite one or both of the reasons above. Your response would make sense because both contribute, but a recent study done in Australia found something else.

Saturday, April 10, 2010

"The proof is in the pudding" is one of those seemingly clever catchphrases that you might say in the quick give-and-take of conversation. But don't ever write it unless you're compiling a list of the most confusing idioms.

That's because the saying is missing key words.

The original saying, "The proof of the pudding is in the eating," means things are uncertain until tested or in this specific instance tasted, which isn't what most people want to convey when they say the shortened version of the phrase.

Saturday, April 3, 2010

Chris Crowley has the right idea. He doesn't delve, however, into scientific details.

You learned about Crowley in this column last October. He's the guy who went from a lawyer at a prestigious New York City firm to a ski bum to the co-author of two books on aging well, the best-known being Younger Next Year: Live Strong, Fit, and Sexy Until You're 80 and Beyond. As a result, Crowley now spends much of his time speaking to groups of graybeards on how to become "functionally younger."