Saturday, April 30, 2016
     

Fitness Master

Saturday, February 12, 2011

If you'd add up the time needed to produce a Fitness Master article, you'd realize I'd fare better financially busing tables at any eatery in the area. So why do I feel so fortunate to be the one writing this column?

Because real living is far more than accruing cash. Sometimes it's a nurturing of knowledge that expands awareness and creates a wild time in the amusement park of your mind.

Writing this column grants me that admission.

Saturday, February 5, 2011

You might think that my lack of a medical degree would in some way limit this column. Instead, the lack is liberating, allowing intuition, experimentation, and common sense to be peers rather than poor little sisters of scientific research.

My first column on the low-carb crazecreated in large part by the paperback publication of Dr. Atkins' New Diet Revolution in 1999serves as a fine example of the fruits of this freedom.

Saturday, February 5, 2011

You might think that my lack of a medical degree would in some way limit this column. Instead, the lack is liberating, allowing intuition, experimentation, and common sense to be peers rather than poor little sisters of scientific research.

My first column on the low-carb crazecreated in large part by the paperback publication of Dr. Atkins' New Diet Revolution in 1999serves as a fine example of the fruits of this freedom.

Saturday, January 22, 2011

Structure can be a student's greatest ally.

Because of this, there's a designated spot on my chalkboard where all homework is listed every day. I begin class by referring to the list and frequently end class by saying, "Don't leave the room unless you're sure how to do the assignment."

Despite these daily routines, I've been hearing this declaration more and more over the last few years: "I didn't know we had homework."

Saturday, January 15, 2011

In school-speak, a mission statement is a short summary written by a school district as to what it sees as its primary goal for the students it serves. Some declare that "All students can and will succeed."

While the pronouncement sounds rather impressive, there's a problem with it besides the brazen use of "all."

Saturday, January 8, 2011

Over the past year or so, much has been written about America's liberal use of salt, the chemical compound known as sodium chloride used to preserve and flavor foods, because too much sodium in your diet hurts your health. I possess, for instance, a folder full of articles that links high sodium ingestion to hypertension, heart disease, and stroke.

One claims that cutting back on salt could save thousands of lives in just the United Kingdom alone. Another projects a U.S. reduction in salt use by just 10 percent could save billions in healthcare costs.

Friday, December 31, 2010

I love receiving e-mails like Mike's.

He wrote to tell me that he takes many of the exercise and eating tips suggested in this column, tweaks them to best suit his situation, and gets good use out of them. In fact, he wears the same size pants he did 20 years ago yet he's packed on nearly 30 pounds of muscle.

Friday, December 24, 2010

I was the captain of the baseball team my senior year, so I led the team through the regimented 20-minute stretch routine that began every practice but only because of my captaincy.

Not, in Coach Seip's opinion, because I was very flexible.

Saturday, December 11, 2010

"I might not be able to define it, but I certainly know it when I see it." Years ago, when a lawyer demanded a definition of pornography in a court of law, that's supposedly what Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart said.

I often borrow those words when I'm asked to define something far different.

Excellence.

Sure, I can tell you exactly what makes a meal or a workout excellent if your goal is health and fitness, and the same is true for a novel or a newspaper column, but there's no way I can express what makes one song so much better than the other.

Saturday, December 4, 2010

Not every weightlifter wants to become massive.

In fact, the majority of people of lift weights whether they be females, endurance athletes, or middle-of-the-road exercisers more concerned about maintaining health than improving fitness don't want to develop too much size. This desire, however, does not mean the lifting has to be halfhearted.

Your workouts still should be intense; it's just that the end product should result in something other than adding two inches of muscle to your quads and an inch to your chest.