Wednesday, July 30, 2014
     

Fitness Master

Saturday, October 30, 2010

Heard any bad jokes lately?

I have. But my joke doesn't have a punch line. It's a saying that, if accepted as the truth, is surely no joking matter.

"Forty is the new 30."

It's supposed to indicate that people are not only living longer but also aging better. For too many middle-aged Americans, however, this is totally untrue.

For them, a more accurate saying is "Fifty is the new 75."

Saturday, October 23, 2010

It's quite possible that nothing helps you more than something you probably do your darndest to live without.

The feeling of doubt.

Without doubt, there is no questioning. Without questioning, there is no considering. Without considering, there is no real thinking.

Without real thinking, there is no mental or emotional growth.

But that doesn't mean you have to question everything. Some things have withstood the test of time.

Like the phrase "withstood the test of time." It's a cliché, a phrase that's become trite from overuse.

Saturday, October 16, 2010

Two weeks ago you read about a study done with rats at Yale University that found the brains of rats bred to be genetically predisposed to obesity reacted differently to being fed a high-fat diet than those who were bred to be lean.

The finding led the lead author to write that obesity is "less about personal will" and more about genetics.

Since I disagree, I countered with "genetic predisposition is not destiny," especially for humans not specially bred, and used deduction reaching a particular conclusion from general information to prove it.

Saturday, October 9, 2010

Although hundreds of novels are published each year in more than a half dozen genres, you can argue that at the core of each whether it be science fiction, mystery, or romance is one of two conflicts. Either the main character battles an external force, such as another character or nature, or the main character battles an internal element, such as a doubt or a demon, inside himself.

Something similar can be said about diet books.

Saturday, October 2, 2010

In a classic episode where the Three Stooges masquerade as plumbers, they decide the plumbing doesn't work in a mansion they are working on because some of the pipes are filled with electrical wires.

So they remove them and hook those pipes to the water pipes. Shortly afterwards, the light bulbs in the kitchen fill with water, explode, and water flows from lighting fixtures as if they were fountains.

Saturday, September 25, 2010

What's the chance that there's a column like this one in a newspaper printed somewhere in Great Britain? And what's with British women?

I ask those questions because of the results from a poll of 1,305 Brits. When asked how they would like to lose excess weight, two percent of the women surveyed said they'd exercise more, six percent said they'd combine a diet with more exercise, and 14 percent said they'd simply eat less.

But what about the other 78 percent of the women polled?

Saturday, September 18, 2010

When a writer has previously stated his closest political ties are to the Libertarian party and then pens a headline that proposes a new tax, there better be an explanation. Let me begin mine by posing a philosophical question.

What do you do when an important belief of yours proves to be ineffectual in a specific situation?

Saturday, September 11, 2010

Certain health "secrets" are not really secrets at all. But they are simple.

Simple to establish, that is.

Following them for many, however, seems to be another matter.

Take the increase in type 2 diabetes, for instance, an increase so great that the World Health Organization has declared it an epidemic. At the current pace, the number of cases worldwide will double by 2030, with the U.S. having nearly 50 million stricken with the disease no more than 20 years later.

Saturday, September 4, 2010

Let's take a popular, locally made beverage, Zimmerman's Iced Tea, and perform a taste test outside a store that attracts a diverse clientele, such as the Walmart on 443 in Lehighton. We'll give adult volunteers a half-pint carton of Zimmy's and an unmarked half-pint carton of iced tea and ask them to decide which tastes better.

Only we'll pull a trick on them.

We'll have filled Zimmerman's Iced Tea in the unmarked cartons.

Out of 100 adult volunteers, how many do you think would recognize that there's no difference in the taste? Five? Ten?

Saturday, August 28, 2010

Migratory birds, it seems, instinctively understand the link between food, health, and physical performance.

During other times of the year, migratory birds eat primarily insects and seeds. During migration, however, they eat deeply colored berries.

Why the change? Deeply colored berries are loaded with antioxidants, which have been shown in animals and humans to negate the oxidation exacerbated by bad diet, environmental pollution, and physical exertion.

Oxidation creates the inflammation that can lead to aging and disease.