Thursday, April 24, 2014
     

Fitness Master

Friday, December 24, 2010

I was the captain of the baseball team my senior year, so I led the team through the regimented 20-minute stretch routine that began every practice but only because of my captaincy.

Not, in Coach Seip's opinion, because I was very flexible.

Saturday, December 11, 2010

"I might not be able to define it, but I certainly know it when I see it." Years ago, when a lawyer demanded a definition of pornography in a court of law, that's supposedly what Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart said.

I often borrow those words when I'm asked to define something far different.

Excellence.

Sure, I can tell you exactly what makes a meal or a workout excellent if your goal is health and fitness, and the same is true for a novel or a newspaper column, but there's no way I can express what makes one song so much better than the other.

Saturday, December 4, 2010

Not every weightlifter wants to become massive.

In fact, the majority of people of lift weights whether they be females, endurance athletes, or middle-of-the-road exercisers more concerned about maintaining health than improving fitness don't want to develop too much size. This desire, however, does not mean the lifting has to be halfhearted.

Your workouts still should be intense; it's just that the end product should result in something other than adding two inches of muscle to your quads and an inch to your chest.

Saturday, November 27, 2010

It was only a short phone call and a few weeks ago but it still has me thinking.

During most Saturday mornings during the bicycle racing off-season, I will ride from my father's house near Reading to meet anywhere from two to 20 cyclists who gather about nine miles away in Oley for a training ride that's usually 60 to 65 miles. We call the leader of the ride Big Jim, and if the wind chill is in the single digits or rain or snow is in the forecast, I'll call him on the phone that morning to find out if he's riding outside that day.

Saturday, November 13, 2010

According to nearly 80,000 responses gathered by the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rogue, Louisiana, on any given day less than half of U.S. adults engage in what's considered by the Metabolic Equivalent (MET) intensity values "moderate activity," and the most frequently listed moderate activity for those who did was can you believe it? food preparation.

Since when did scooping coffee, scrambling eggs, and chopping onions constitute a workout?

Saturday, November 6, 2010

After a recent visit to see my niece and nephew, my brother walked me to my car. As he did, a neighbor approached whom I did not know.

He looked to be no more than 30 and possessed a muscular yet athletic build that told me he engaged in far more than typical health club workouts. Maybe that's why when my brother introduced me he added, "And he was writing health and fitness articles while you were in diapers."

Saturday, November 6, 2010

After a recent visit to see my niece and nephew, my brother walked me to my car. As he did, a neighbor approached whom I did not know.

He looked to be no more than 30 and possessed a muscular yet athletic build that told me he engaged in far more than typical health club workouts. Maybe that's why when my brother introduced me he added, "And he was writing health and fitness articles while you were in diapers."

Saturday, October 30, 2010

Heard any bad jokes lately?

I have. But my joke doesn't have a punch line. It's a saying that, if accepted as the truth, is surely no joking matter.

"Forty is the new 30."

It's supposed to indicate that people are not only living longer but also aging better. For too many middle-aged Americans, however, this is totally untrue.

For them, a more accurate saying is "Fifty is the new 75."

Saturday, October 23, 2010

It's quite possible that nothing helps you more than something you probably do your darndest to live without.

The feeling of doubt.

Without doubt, there is no questioning. Without questioning, there is no considering. Without considering, there is no real thinking.

Without real thinking, there is no mental or emotional growth.

But that doesn't mean you have to question everything. Some things have withstood the test of time.

Like the phrase "withstood the test of time." It's a cliché, a phrase that's become trite from overuse.

Saturday, October 16, 2010

Two weeks ago you read about a study done with rats at Yale University that found the brains of rats bred to be genetically predisposed to obesity reacted differently to being fed a high-fat diet than those who were bred to be lean.

The finding led the lead author to write that obesity is "less about personal will" and more about genetics.

Since I disagree, I countered with "genetic predisposition is not destiny," especially for humans not specially bred, and used deduction reaching a particular conclusion from general information to prove it.