Thursday, June 29, 2017
     

Fitness Master

Saturday, August 11, 2012

Picture a wise old yogi with a flowing white beard in a flowing white robe. A hermit who meditates high on a remote mountain and only reveals the secrets of the universe to truth seekers serious enough to make the ascent.

Now picture his knees bent and arms raised for balance, one foot forward, a wild look in his eyes. His bare feet on a surfboard and the surfboard atop the crest of a frothing wave.

I saw such an image on a poster more than 30 years ago. I'll never forget it, probably because the caption contained such good advice.

Saturday, July 21, 2012

When the topic turns to food, the objective is often simple: to cite studies (and possibly personal experience) to get you to consume less of something.

A column printed nearly 12 years ago, for example, urged you not to drink any soda. That's because a study using Massachusetts middle schoolers published in The Lancet, England's prestigious medical journal, found that the kids' odds of becoming obese increased with every daily serving of a sugar-sweetened drink.

Saturday, June 23, 2012

Guess what? There is no way to escape aging. You are of the nature to grow old and die.

Both old age and death are inevitable.

While that's hardly a heartwarming thought, it certainly is true. And it certainly is something you should think about even if thinking about it depresses you.

Because thinking about it just might get you up off your butt and exercising, get you eating good things instead of junk. Yes, I know some will read this intro and do the opposite because there's no winning a war against inevitability, but I hope that way of thinking is not for you.

Saturday, May 26, 2012

After years of researching the subject, Lee Jones, a scientist at Duke University, believes he knows how those who would rather not exercise can avoiding doing so yet still receive the same health benefits. If you have aversion to exercise, all you need to do is take 200 different drugs.

Monday, May 21, 2012

Painfully obvious, yet potentially effective. That's how you might characterize the following statement.

Eat 550 more calories per day than what you need to maintain your present weight, and you are going to add some. In fact, you should probably gain slightly more than a pound a week for at least the first few months.

Saturday, April 28, 2012

Time tosses aside the trivial. That's why you should pay particular attention to sayings that take on a life of their own, especially ones that outlive three different speakers in three different countries and pertain to your health.

"You are what you eat" is one such statement. First expressed by the French food critic Anthelme Brillat-Savarin in 1826, the sentiment was then written in a philosophical essay by the German philosopher Ludwig Andreas Feuerbach 37 years later.

Saturday, March 31, 2012

A number of well-known nutritionists have said something similar to this: that the obesity epidemic in the U.S. has occurred not from belt-loosening pig-outs but from minor miscalculations. A few go so far as to say that the epidemic would end abruptly and the collective health of America would improve radically if Americans simply consumed 100 fewer calories a day.

That's not much food at all.

Saturday, March 3, 2012

If you immerse yourself in the ocean of presently available health and fitness information, you'll find the waters something other than smooth. The Internet and all the technology it has spawned not only delivers research results faster than ever before, but it has also sired what Marco Bertamini of the University of Liverpool and Mangus Munafo of the University of Bristol call in the January issue of Perspectives on Psychological Science "bite-size science," a trend towards smaller research papers based on fewer studies.

Saturday, February 4, 2012

Coincidence? Possibly. Correlation? Probably.

And if the truth is found in the latter rather than the former, America may look like the Land of the Living Dead by 2050.

The two facts that I fear are related? The increase in a physical affliction that we willfully give ourselves through improper diet and a lack of exercise, type 2 diabetes, and the increase in a mental disease for which there is no known cure, Alzheimer's.

Saturday, January 7, 2012

Food choices are exactly that. Choices. Which means you get to decide.

But what you are deciding is more than a matter of taste or even if you'll gain a couple of pounds. More and more evidence suggests that, to some degree, you could actually be determining your fate.

Or your child's. Especially if you're a pregnant woman.

Research now suggests that when a pregnant woman picks a food she may be doing more than consuming calories or satisfying a craving. She may very well be determining her unborn child's food preferences.