Friday, March 27, 2015
     

Fitness Master

Saturday, October 19, 2013

A study published last summer in Psychological Science shared a strategy that got preschoolers to voluntarily yes, voluntarily more than double the amount of vegetables they ate.

The strategy didn't include rewards or bribes or any degree of deception. What was the only thing the preschoolers were given to get them to eat more veggies?

Knowledge.

Saturday, October 5, 2013

How would you like to look 17.5 years younger than you are?

Now I'm not really sure that I really do (especially if you focus on my Friar Tuck-like hair loss), but I'm not going to lie to you. The fact that one of my students kept insisting that I couldn't be any more than 35 instead of halfway to 53 certainly made my day a few weeks ago.

Thank you, Miss Courtney Murray.

Saturday, September 7, 2013

Does anyone else remember Susan Powter, the former fat mom who wrote three best-selling diet books and became so popular in the 1990s that she hosted her own talk show? Besides her frenetic energy and white buzz cut, what I remember was the start of the infomercial for her first book.

After on off-screen voice lists all that can go wrong on fad diets, Powter appears on screen and shouts out what became her famous catchphrase: "Stop the insanity."

Saturday, August 10, 2013

After a particularly taxing training ride on a Saturday this spring, a training buddy of mine said, "After I shower and eat everything in sight, I'm not leaving the La-Z-boy until I eat again."

When I told him that I planned to read research, so I could start a column Sunday morning, he said, "The weekend's to relax and have some fun, not read stuffy research."

While he may have a point, reading certain articles is definitely not stuffy. In fact, it can be an absolute blast.

Monday, July 22, 2013

Last week you read that research performed at the Penn State College of Medicine in Hershey and presented in June at the annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies revealed that the amount of fat consumed at lunch, not the amount of carbohydrates, correlated to increased daytime sleepiness.

This work is newsworthy for two reasons. First, it contradicts a long-held notion that carbohydrates, especially simple ones eaten in isolation, make you sleepy. Second, it follows a trend of research that could radically change your views on dietary and body fat.

Saturday, March 30, 2013

Sometimes this column answers questions.

Today, it asks one, one specific question that has the potential to polarize the nation like hot-button topics such as abortion and gun control.

The question: Should the government create an environment that stigmatizes and to some degree ostracizes obese people as a way possibly the only way to solve what Daniel Callahan calls "[possibly] the most difficult and elusive public health problem the United States has ever encountered"?

Saturday, March 2, 2013

"That fitness kook is crying wolf again."

If that's what you're thinking after reading the headline, you're wrong. Well, I may be a kook, but just like smoking a single cigarette, a single bad meal certainly affects you.

In fact, the sentiment contained in the headline is why I got interested in nutrition as a teenager. To say I loved food, especially unhealthy food, back then would be right on target.

Saturday, February 2, 2013

I don't think the comment came from jealousy. Someone who has seen the guy's girlfriend, however, might say otherwise.

What I'd like to think is that my brain was distracted still processing the amazing research I had read before meeting a group of about a dozen cyclists in a grocery store parking lot when what sounded like an insult just came out.

Big Jim, the ride leader introduced me to the new guy, a dentist from the Philly area. The dentist said, "You rode with my girlfriend last fall. The dental hygienist going on the cycling vacation. Remember?"

Did I ever.

Saturday, January 5, 2013

It's a rather small article, one I first read last September, and I know why I didn't I didn't write about it then. While it presents a provocative new idea, it lacks the typical slew of studies and statistics to support it.

But as Sir George Pickering once said, "Not everything that counts can be counted." And self-control, a quality that's so crucial to all sorts of success, definitely counts even though you may have a devil of a time counting it.

In fact, it's so crucial to success in life that I'd be remiss not to write about it.

Saturday, December 8, 2012

Five weeks ago, the headline to this column read "A loss of muscle: Why so many diets fail." The column used hypothetical examples of overweight women losing weight with and without augmenting the loss with exercise and explained why those who exercise have a far better chance of maintaining the weight loss.

Exercise during moderate weight loss insures that the weight lost is primarily fat. Without exercise as much as 50 percent of the weight loss can be muscle.

Losing muscle makes it more likely that the weight lost will be regained for a simple reason. Muscle isn't inert.