Thursday, August 28, 2014
     

Fitness Master

Saturday, March 2, 2013

"That fitness kook is crying wolf again."

If that's what you're thinking after reading the headline, you're wrong. Well, I may be a kook, but just like smoking a single cigarette, a single bad meal certainly affects you.

In fact, the sentiment contained in the headline is why I got interested in nutrition as a teenager. To say I loved food, especially unhealthy food, back then would be right on target.

Saturday, February 2, 2013

I don't think the comment came from jealousy. Someone who has seen the guy's girlfriend, however, might say otherwise.

What I'd like to think is that my brain was distracted still processing the amazing research I had read before meeting a group of about a dozen cyclists in a grocery store parking lot when what sounded like an insult just came out.

Big Jim, the ride leader introduced me to the new guy, a dentist from the Philly area. The dentist said, "You rode with my girlfriend last fall. The dental hygienist going on the cycling vacation. Remember?"

Did I ever.

Saturday, January 5, 2013

It's a rather small article, one I first read last September, and I know why I didn't I didn't write about it then. While it presents a provocative new idea, it lacks the typical slew of studies and statistics to support it.

But as Sir George Pickering once said, "Not everything that counts can be counted." And self-control, a quality that's so crucial to all sorts of success, definitely counts even though you may have a devil of a time counting it.

In fact, it's so crucial to success in life that I'd be remiss not to write about it.

Saturday, December 8, 2012

Five weeks ago, the headline to this column read "A loss of muscle: Why so many diets fail." The column used hypothetical examples of overweight women losing weight with and without augmenting the loss with exercise and explained why those who exercise have a far better chance of maintaining the weight loss.

Exercise during moderate weight loss insures that the weight lost is primarily fat. Without exercise as much as 50 percent of the weight loss can be muscle.

Losing muscle makes it more likely that the weight lost will be regained for a simple reason. Muscle isn't inert.

Monday, December 3, 2012

The October 13 column about creatine focused on the product's versatility. Once a staple for hardcore bodybuilders and weightlifters who wanted to add muscle, the supplement is now used by many endurance athletes and also to treat depression.

Saturday, November 10, 2012

Last week's column explained how the reduction in your metabolic rate is what does in most diets and how exercise helps negate that. But that's not news to those who regularly read this column.

The following benefit of exercise during dieting, however, should be.

While exercise expends energy, meaning you burn calories, it actually reduces your urge to eat immediately afterwards, according to a study performed at Brigham Young University.

Saturday, October 13, 2012

Time to tell you about a workout supplement that worked too well. Again.

October is when serious cyclists get serious in the weight room, but last October I was feeling so beat up and weak that I couldn't imagine lifting with any intensity.

Saturday, September 8, 2012

Zoloft is one of the many drugs to battle depression. As it does, it can also create, according to the Nurses Drug Guide, 55 adverse side effects, including chest pain, blurred vision, loss of hair, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, paranoia, and suicidal thoughts.

Oh, and males can develop breasts and lose sexual function.

Running is one of the many exercises used to battle depression. As it does, it can also create, according to any runner's guide, a few adverse side effects, including blisters, shin splints, runner's knee, and plantar fascia.

Saturday, August 11, 2012

Picture a wise old yogi with a flowing white beard in a flowing white robe. A hermit who meditates high on a remote mountain and only reveals the secrets of the universe to truth seekers serious enough to make the ascent.

Now picture his knees bent and arms raised for balance, one foot forward, a wild look in his eyes. His bare feet on a surfboard and the surfboard atop the crest of a frothing wave.

I saw such an image on a poster more than 30 years ago. I'll never forget it, probably because the caption contained such good advice.

Saturday, July 21, 2012

When the topic turns to food, the objective is often simple: to cite studies (and possibly personal experience) to get you to consume less of something.

A column printed nearly 12 years ago, for example, urged you not to drink any soda. That's because a study using Massachusetts middle schoolers published in The Lancet, England's prestigious medical journal, found that the kids' odds of becoming obese increased with every daily serving of a sugar-sweetened drink.