Monday, July 6, 2015
     

Fitness Master

Saturday, February 15, 2014

Belaboring a point isn't always a bad thing. Before your first solo skydive, for instance, don't you want your instructor repeating exactly where the reserve cord is and how to use it ad nauseam?

While I hope my use of repetition never makes you ill, I will at times harp on, hash over, and hammer home because it's easy for you in the midst of all the many other things you absolutely need to do to lose sight of the elements essential to optimal health.

Saturday, January 25, 2014

Been there. Done that.

That's the response I fear regular readers will have when they first see the headline of this column. After all, they've probably read a dozen "Fitness Master" articles explaining how poor eating choices lead to weight gain, which increases the likelihood of obesity, heart disease, Alzheimer's disease, certain cancers, diabetes, depression . . . .

Yada, yada, yada.

Monday, December 9, 2013

Who likes being sick?

While I'm not a big believer in beginning an article with a ridiculous rhetorical question, I need you to remember just how miserable a relatively minor health issue like a sore throat can make your workday, how it can sap the joy out of anything you need or want to do afterwards, and how it can keep you from much-needed sleep.

Saturday, November 30, 2013

In an article published in early October in his syndicated column, "Stone Age Doc," Dr. Phillip J. Goscienski wrote that grains, sugar, and dairy products food sources not used by humans hundreds of thousands of years ago when our present "body chemistry" was being formed now comprise more than 70 percent of the world's caloric intake.

Saturday, November 2, 2013

If you're in a hurry, it's the sort of study you could easily overlook. I know I almost did. In late August, the journal Nature released research online that linked eating a low-fat diet to improving the quality of bacteria in your gut.

So what?

Saturday, October 19, 2013

A study published last summer in Psychological Science shared a strategy that got preschoolers to voluntarily yes, voluntarily more than double the amount of vegetables they ate.

The strategy didn't include rewards or bribes or any degree of deception. What was the only thing the preschoolers were given to get them to eat more veggies?

Knowledge.

Saturday, October 5, 2013

How would you like to look 17.5 years younger than you are?

Now I'm not really sure that I really do (especially if you focus on my Friar Tuck-like hair loss), but I'm not going to lie to you. The fact that one of my students kept insisting that I couldn't be any more than 35 instead of halfway to 53 certainly made my day a few weeks ago.

Thank you, Miss Courtney Murray.

Saturday, September 7, 2013

Does anyone else remember Susan Powter, the former fat mom who wrote three best-selling diet books and became so popular in the 1990s that she hosted her own talk show? Besides her frenetic energy and white buzz cut, what I remember was the start of the infomercial for her first book.

After on off-screen voice lists all that can go wrong on fad diets, Powter appears on screen and shouts out what became her famous catchphrase: "Stop the insanity."

Saturday, August 10, 2013

After a particularly taxing training ride on a Saturday this spring, a training buddy of mine said, "After I shower and eat everything in sight, I'm not leaving the La-Z-boy until I eat again."

When I told him that I planned to read research, so I could start a column Sunday morning, he said, "The weekend's to relax and have some fun, not read stuffy research."

While he may have a point, reading certain articles is definitely not stuffy. In fact, it can be an absolute blast.

Monday, July 22, 2013

Last week you read that research performed at the Penn State College of Medicine in Hershey and presented in June at the annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies revealed that the amount of fat consumed at lunch, not the amount of carbohydrates, correlated to increased daytime sleepiness.

This work is newsworthy for two reasons. First, it contradicts a long-held notion that carbohydrates, especially simple ones eaten in isolation, make you sleepy. Second, it follows a trend of research that could radically change your views on dietary and body fat.