Friday, October 31, 2014
     

Fitness Master

Saturday, April 10, 2010

"The proof is in the pudding" is one of those seemingly clever catchphrases that you might say in the quick give-and-take of conversation. But don't ever write it unless you're compiling a list of the most confusing idioms.

That's because the saying is missing key words.

The original saying, "The proof of the pudding is in the eating," means things are uncertain until tested or in this specific instance tasted, which isn't what most people want to convey when they say the shortened version of the phrase.

Saturday, April 3, 2010

Chris Crowley has the right idea. He doesn't delve, however, into scientific details.

You learned about Crowley in this column last October. He's the guy who went from a lawyer at a prestigious New York City firm to a ski bum to the co-author of two books on aging well, the best-known being Younger Next Year: Live Strong, Fit, and Sexy Until You're 80 and Beyond. As a result, Crowley now spends much of his time speaking to groups of graybeards on how to become "functionally younger."

Saturday, March 27, 2010

I had cleaned up a kid's vomit before, so that wasn't the shock of my Saturday night a few weeks ago.

The shock occurred when we deviated from our tried-and-true plan. Normally when my father and I baby-sit my niece and nephew so that my brother and his wife can go out to eat and catch an early movie, we play at Pop-Pop's until the kids get hungry, and then he takes them out to eat at Arby's or McDonald's.

Saturday, March 20, 2010

If you call the Korean War a draw, the United States has only ever lost one war of any significance: the Vietnam War.

Almost every explanation for how that occurred mentions that civil unrest kept the government from issuing an all-out offensive and that a people fighting for their lives, land, and culture fights far harder than a primarily conscripted force fighting halfway around the world for an abstract idea.

Though I'm no historian, I believe there's another equally important reason for why the U.S. lost the war.

A late start.

Saturday, March 13, 2010

Less than two months ago, a Palmerton Area High School sophomore committed suicide. Word spread through the junior high school the next day, and many who knew the boy agonized over the loss.

This agony seemed to dredge up awful fears and memories in others, creating a classic example of the ripple effect. Tears begot tears, and by midday any attempts at school work were useless.

As kids sat in small groups comforting one another, more than once I heard the question asked.

Why?

Saturday, March 6, 2010

Before you read on, take a moment or two and answer the following question: If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?

That question is the fifth of 19 that constitute what's know as Proust's Questionnaire, a feature found in each issue of Vanity Fair for more than 15 years. It's named after French novelist Marcel Proust for he felt that answering the questions ones that originally started as a parlor game in France revealed your true nature.

Saturday, February 27, 2010

Although I rarely go to movies in theaters (last time was 1989 to see "Rainman") or even rent them, I find myself reading every best-of-the-year movie list I find. The same is true for best-of-the-year lists of music CDs (which I rarely buy) and theater productions (which I rarely attend).

Call it vicarious living if you will, but for some reason I'm drawn to best-of lists.

The same is true for articles that predict the trends for the upcoming year, especially the ones about health and fitness. I've probably read a dozen or so for 2010, and I feel the need to respond.

Saturday, February 13, 2010

According to the writing great F. Scott Fitzgerald, last week's column required you to possess "first-rate intelligence," a characteristic he feels you need to honestly assess two extremely different ideas simultaneously.

Saturday, February 6, 2010

When I first became interested in cycling, my previous athletic experiences helped. After more than five years of playing basketball every chance I got passing up the prom, for instance, to shoot jumpers by streetlight I averaged running 50 miles per week for the next five while competing in dozens of races, including five marathons.

Such a well-developed aerobic base allowed me to have immediate success racing bicycles at the beginner's level, especially if the course was particularly hilly or otherwise demanding.

Saturday, January 30, 2010

The pendulum, it seems, has swung again.

Research released in December again cautions against the use of high-fat low-carb diets.

The European study using obese, pre-diabetic adults found the use of high-fat low-carb diets as effective as low-fat high-carb diets for losing weight, a matter already established in earlier research.