Lansford Borough Council at a special meeting Thursday agreed to hire The Service Team to replace the police station windows that Carl Stevens Jr. allegedly smashed during a short-lived and inexplicable rampage in March.

The new windows are expected to cost about $3,325. Councilman Lenny Kovach voted against the purchase, saying he wanted to see the windows to compare the various types.

The other council members who attended the meeting, Samantha Yasson, Mary Soberick and President Rosemary Cannon, voted in favor.

Stevens, 33, who told police he lived in Nesquehoning, had been sitting on a bench across the street from the building on March 13. Then, for reasons known only to him, he got up, walked across the street and took a tire iron to the windows in the police station, which is in the basement of the borough hall, and to a large window in the tax collector's office on the first floor.

Then, police said, Stevens sat down for a smoke as he waited for police to arrive.

The day's drama didn't end there: Stevens went berserk in the Lansford office of District Judge Casimir Kosciolek, fighting with police and flipping over a desk. He remains in the Carbon County Correctional Facility, awaiting trial.

In other matters, council agreed to make the final payment to Shea Industries Inc., of Clarks Summit, Lackawanna County. The company had bid $23,723 to demolish the 80-year-old American Fire Co. No. 1/borough hall building at 26 E. Patterson St.

The fire company plans to build a pole building on the site.

Council also paid bills, discussed insurance coverage, and approved a sidewalk sale and craft event planned by Lansford Alive! for Oct. 5.

It also discussed a property at 860 E. Patterson St., which is being offered to the borough free of charge by Wells Fargo Bank. Solicitor Michael Greek has reviewed the paperwork, and everything is in order for the borough to accept the property, which had been foreclosed upon.