Carbon Career and Technical Institute has welcomed the new Drafting and Design Technology program as well as a pilot program for Spanish in the Workplace into its curriculum this school year.

In the Drafting and Design Technology program, students learn the skills needed to create plans, drawings, and models for designing and constructing buildings and manufactured products. The program focuses on mechanical, architectural, and civil drafting.

During his 16 years in the drafting field, program instructor Jeremy Pease has had experience in interior design, corporate security design, and electrical design.

"Everything I know and have experienced in drafting and design, I want to teach the students," he said.

In the program, students learn hand drawing, mechanical drawing, architectural drawing, civil drafting, technical math, technical physics, basic surveying, CADD, blueprint reading, and CAD modeling.

Pease stated that the classroom is equipped with high-speed computers with AutoCAD software, the same software used in the field. The classroom is also equipped with a large scale plotter used to produce prints.

Students also use a 3-D plotter to reproduce 3-dimensional images out of plastic. The images are created on the computer and sent to the plotter, which then reproduces the image in a 3-dimensional plastic form.

Students in this program can follow up their education with associate's and bachelors degree's in Drafting Technology, Graphic Design, Construction Technology, Construction Management, and Architectural, Civil, and Mechanical Engineering.

Students studying drafting can receive employment opportunities as a drafter, CAD or CADD designer and operator, and architectural, civil, and mechanical engineers.

Starting this past November, CCTI also offered Spanish in the workplace as a pilot class for the Health and Medical Assistant students. The 26-hour pilot course was offered to the health and medical assistant students since many times people in those fields must communicate with Spanish speaking patients.

The class was taught by Abe Jardines whose first language is Spanish.

Jardines stated that he has taught Spanish to reserve police officers. He also taught Spanish at a police academy in New Jersey.

The class focused on Spanish vocabulary and communication. Jardines went over vocabulary and phrases with the students who then spent time communicating to each other in Spanish.

The students also wrote scenarios in Spanish and the class would go over them. They translated about nine medical-related articles from Spanish.

David Reinbold, administrative director, said Michele Dominic, Health and Medical Assistant instructor, was very supportive of having this opportunity for the students.

"The pilot program went very well," Reinbold said. "The class really sparked an interest."

"At the end of the class, I was able to understand what the students were saying. They were doing very well and they had learned a lot," Jardines added.

Reinbold thanked the Joint Operating Committee for voting to have these new programs at CCTI.

"The Joint Operating Committee has been very supportive of both these new programs," he said.