Lansford property owners will likely pay 1 mill more in real estate tax this year, but they have been relived of occupational and per capita levies.

The four members of borough council who met on Friday evening all agreed on a $1,506,184 budget that calls for the tax increase.

The boost brings the property tax levy to 33.47 mills. That means the owner of a home assessed at $25,000 would pay $836.75 this year, up from $811.75 last year.

The millage breaks down to 26.97 mills for the general fund; 0.1 mill for the library; 0.5 mill for pensions; 2.78 mills for street lighting; 1.11 mills for fire protection; 0.61 mill for recreation and 1.4 mills for debt service.

Council president Rose Mary Cannon plans to call a special meeting to adopt the spending plan.

An increase in the amount of revenue each mill generates helped stave off a larger tax increase. Each mill is expected to generate $34,010 this year, up $634 from last year.

Council members and tax collector Daniel Wynn have often pointed out that the per capita and occupational – $10 and up to about $30, respectively – cost more to collect than they generate in revenue. many people simply ignore them.

Vadyak said that, "for those who pay their (per capita and occupational), it's a wash." Those who fail to pay the taxes will be more likely to pay the property tax.

Cannon and Councilman Tommy Vadyak thanked those council members who participated in the budget process and attended Friday's meeting: Samantha Yasson, Mary Kruczek, Cannon and Vadyak.

"It took a lot of hours and a lot of discussion," Vadyak said. Finally determining a budget, he said, "moved the town forward."

Crafting the 2012 budget was no easy task: A team composed of auditors, council members and local businessman Bob Silver have been working to organize the borough's financial records.

The disarray includes unpaid bills, and bank deposits and fee payments not being recorded.

Compounding the trouble, the borough has experienced a succession of secretary/treasurers over the past several years.