Antioch Church of Conshohocken received preliminary approval for a worship center at the former White Christmas tree farm on High Hill Road at this week's meeting of the Washington Township supervisors.

The 14-1/2 acre lot was purchased in 2008. In 2011 the zoning hearing board gave approval for three buildings of 3,800 square feet each to have sleeping quarters. The sleep areas will be considered an accessory use and may house no more than 72 people. No one may stay at the center for more than a week.

There will be 32 parking spots at the worship center with no extra ones for the sleeping quarters which may be used only in conjunction with the worship center.

The sewage planning module is with the sewage enforcement officer.

A waiver was requested to accept the plan at 1 inch equal to 60 feet instead of the required 1 inch equal to 50 feet.

The Lehigh Valley Planning Commission wants stormwater information before approving the plan.

Resident John Sadowski asked where the driveway will be located.

There is a pre-existing driveway but because of the change of use a new driveway permit will be required and the location will be checked at that time.

The plan was given preliminary conditional plan approval. The condition imposed is to meet the requirements of the Aug. 25 review letter from Engineer Roy Stewart.

Horizon Builders' lot 2 in the Seventh Street subdivision will be donated to the township in lieu of paying recreation fees. Zoning officer Justin Yaich wants Solicitor John Ashley to review the document from Lehigh Engineering before the dedication of the lot.

Requests for donations were turned down for the 2012 budget: Meals on Wheels, the Greater Lehigh Valley Visiting Nurses Association and Peaceable Kingdom. The township pays for animal control at the Sanctuary at Haafsville and the latest year Peaceable Kingdom was used it excluded the spay-neuter program which it is now requesting payment for.

Rebecca Kennedy from the Lehigh County Conservation District brought a report on the Coplay Creek watershed study and said the assessment of Trout Creek will be much the same.

A copy of a letter which will go to all landowners bordering the creek will request permission to cross the properties to reach the creek. Unless the district hears back, it presumes permission is given to cross to the creek.

Kennedy and Erin Frederick will do the work. The report is useful to the township and engineer, she said.

An amendment to the earned income tax ordinance defines who is subject to the tax, the imposition of the tax, how it is handled if it is in more than one municipality, the tax officer's obligations and who can be audited. It was adopted.

The multi-township salt bid will be advertised.

The Pennsylvania State Association of Township Supervisors suggested townships name Sept. 11, 2011, as a date to be remembered with reverence.

Rick Kistler said Trout Creek flooded and debris has been washed onto the infield at the Slatedale playground. He wanted it on record that the township would take care of it because it is township property.

He added that the playground committee still has not received any money toward electricity. The playground was to pay the bill during the baseball season and the township the rest of the year.

Bids were opened and accepted for road materials and fuel but no bids were awarded.

Sadowski said the road crew did a good job on High Hill Road, but asked "What about the Jaindl property (at the intersection of Old Post Road and High Hill)?

Yaich will check to see if progress is being made.

Resident Kim Rotkewicz said he lives across from the lamp factory and has four inches of dirt in his basement on Hillside Road from flooding. A drain was not cleaned in 20 years. He said on Skyline, the road above him, a new pipe was placed without a study.

Yaich is to check.

Resident Ed Ziegler said a tree that came down on Route 873 and took out wires should have been pruned earlier. "Don't let the tree behind Emerald Fire Company go down on the wires," he said.

Scout House and Welshtown roads need line painting because the line is almost gone, Ziegler said.