HARRISBURG State Sen. David G. Argall (R-29) and Representatives Jerry Knowles (R-124) and Mike Tobash (R-125) applauded Senator Pat Toomey and Secretary Ray LaHood for removing unnecessary and costly federal requirements for new local street signs. The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation estimated the cost to be approximately $10 million for the entire state.

The federal government was requiring local governments to replace all local street signs based on reflectivity and increasing the size of letters for easier viewing at night by 2018.

In June, after hearing several constituents' concerns at numerous town hall meetings, Argall, Knowles and Tobash sent a letter to federal lawmakers, including Toomey, demanding action on wasteful federal mandates and spending. Last week, Senator Toomey announced the federal government's decision to eliminate the deadline for street sign mandates.

"This is a big win for our taxpayers," said Argall, who called for a news conference with a local constituent demanding action on June 10. "I'm pleased to see Senator Toomey take a proactive approach in protecting Pennsylvania taxpayers. During the numerous town hall meetings I have held throughout the six counties I represent, these proposed new street signs were referenced often as another example of wasteful spending and unfunded mandates."

"Our communities continue to struggle with a tough economy, and the last thing they need to contend with is another mandate," said Knowles. "The federal mandate to upgrade street signs would have financially strained local communities saddled with this burden. I'm pleased to see the federal government show some common sense as they wanted to upgrade perfectly good street signs with a hefty price tag for taxpayers. I applaud Senator Toomey in his efforts to halt this unfunded mandate."

Tobash said, "I am gratified that there is federal support behind our goal of reducing wasteful spending in Pennsylvania."

Argall, Knowles and Tobash are hopeful the federal government will review the issue of "sidewalks to nowhere," which has also been another local target by constituents for abuse and waste of tax dollars.