We wonder how Mexico would feel if President Obama or some other statesman visited that country and told their leaders how they should deal with the problems of their country.

We're betting they would tell us to shut up and mind our own business.

Yet Mexican President Felipe Calderon has taken his case for an overhaul of U.S. immigration policies to our Congress.

During a much-ballyhooed state visit to our country, Calderon has had private meetings with Obama, and yesterday went before Congress and pushed for immigration changes and emphasized the economic priorities linking the U.S. and Mexico.

He was openly critical of the new law in Arizona, where authorities are authorized to crack down on anyone they suspect of being an illegal alien.

Instead of coming here to visit and criticize us, Calderon would better off returning to Mexico and seeking answers to why so many of his people are willing to break the law and sneak into this country illegally. The answer, of course, is the potential for a better lifestyle, make that a much better lifestyle, exists inside our borders and not his.

Yes, we have border and security problems, trying to stem the tide of illegals coming into our country. But as far as we know, Mexcio does little or nothing to halt the influx of illegals from their side of the border. And, why should they? Many of those coming into this country are lawbreakers and undesirables. Getting them out of Mexico is a good thing - for Mexico.

According to an Associated Press story Calderon's state visit comes at a time of renewed furor over the flawed immigration system from Mexico into the United States. From border security troubles to questions about how to deal with the millions of illegal immigrants living in the U.S., the immigration debate remains politically vexing, frustrating and volatile.

There's no argument that the U.S. has to do something about the problem of millions of illegal aliens invading our country, utilizing our resources and causing a severe strain on our economy and our standards of living. We must get tougher, a lot tougher. The new Arizona law may be the first step in the right direction.

But we don't need the President of Mexico coming here and telling us what is wrong with us, and what we should do. He has the audicity to tell us how we should treat his people, when, obviously, he can't treat them himself.

We're sure he has enough troubles of his own. If not, why would so many of his fellow citizens be so willing to risk life and limb to get here, to the promised land?

By BOB URBAN

rurban@tnonline.com [1]