Palmerton Area School District continues to contemplate how it should proceed with the replacement of its high school roof.

Dave Rodrigues, director of facilities, presented several options to the school board's Buildings and Grounds Committee on Tuesday.

The first option, Rodrigues said, would cost $326,000, while the second option would cost $297,551, for a total cost of $623,500.

Or, another option, Rodrigues said, would cost the district $588,500 for the two projects, or $583,100 to do both projects at the same time.

Both options include the replacement of the boiler room roof, he said.

Superintendent Carol Boyce said the roof comes with a 10-year minimum.

"It may well extend beyond that," Boyce said. "We would need to determine the source of funding."

Rodrigues said the estimated start time would be somewhere between June 7-9, and completed by mid-August.

Also on Tuesday, the committee discussed the P.T.O. Beautification at Towamensing Elementary, as well as the S.S. Palmer/Parkside Education Center.

Boyce told the committee the district has received a request from the Palmer/Parkside P.T.O. Beautification Committee for mulch for the Coal Bowl Playground.

She said there is $3,000 the board put in the 2009-10 budget to be divided equally among both PTO's for their respective playground projects.

Beth Brong, president of the Towamensing P.T.O., said Towamensing would be willing to forego their $1,500 allotment for their playground project to be used toward the Coal Bowl project.

Finally, several committee members commented on a recent tour in which school board members visited each of the buildings in the district.

Committee member Susan Debski said she was thankful for the tour.

"We have a lot of issues in school as well that funds need to go to," Debski said. "I was unaware of how bad our schools were, specifically the junior high and senior high."

Committee member Clarence Myers said the tour was very beneficial.

"It was very informational," Myers said. "There's a lot of work to be done."

Scherer said the tour was a real "eye-opener."

"I think we owe it to our taxpayers to protect our assets," Scherer said.