A Carbon County man was given a long state prison sentence on Monday for a string of burglaries he committed and which were part of a ring of individuals who were also involved in drug dealing.

He was of three defendants who previously pleaded guilty to criminal counts and were sentenced by President Judge Roger N. Nanovic II.

Several break-ins

Wayne Thorpe, 46, of Nesquehoning, was sentenced to a total of five to 10 years in prison in six criminal cases.

Thorpe was part of a multiple-county ring that committed burglaries and also was involved in drug dealing, according to authorities. A total of 12 persons were arrested at part of the ring.

Nanovic sentenced him on four counts of burglary and one count each of robbery and possession of a prohibited weapon.

The break-ins occurred in Summit Hill and Mahoning Township and included the theft of guns and U.S. currency. Thorpe also faces a big restitution bill.

Nanovic ordered total restitution to various victims of over $38,000.

Nanovic also ordered Thorpe to supply a DNA sample, get both drug and alcohol (D&A) and mental health evaluations and follow any recommendations for treatment, no contact with any of the victims, and zero tolerance imposed on D&A use. He was given credit for 691 days spent in prison to date on the charges.

Other cases

Other defendants sentenced by Nanovic were:

Lawrence A. Upshur, 56, of Nesquehoning, was sentenced on a charge of driving under the influence (DUI). He was arrested on Dec. 4, 2009, along North St., in Jim Thorpe. Given a test, the result was .31BAC.

Nanovic sentenced him to serve 90 days to five years in jail, a fine of $2,500, license suspended for 18 months and get a D&A evaluation. He will serve 30 days in jail beginning at 3 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 18, followed by 60 days in the county's Intermediate Punishment Program (IPP) with electronic monitoring.

Todd G. Fatzinger, 45, of Palmerton, was sentenced on charges of possession with intent to manufacture or deliver a controlled substance-methamphetamine and possession. He was arrested by agents of the state Attorney General's office at his residence.

Nanovic sentenced him to the state IPP for 24 months on the first count and a fine of $500 on the possession charge. He was also ordered to supply a DNA sample, have no contact with a co-defendant, get a D&A evaluation and zero tolerance on D&A use.

Each defendant must also pay court costs and a $50 per month supervision fee while on probation or parole.