Monday, October 24, 2016

Friday Feature

Friday, March 1, 2013
DONALD R. SERFASS/TIMES NEWS Washburn & Crosby's Gold Medal Flour, Lafayette Street.

They're called ghost signs and all towns have them.

We pass them every day, but barely take notice.

They're fading reminders of lifestyles long ago, and they speak in silence, these sentinels printed on the sides of brick buildings.

They loom overhead, beckoning to us and sending the same messages they sent to those who came before.

You'll spot them up as high as the top stories of dominant buildings but also down low, as low as the bottom of river walls.

And you'll find them out in the country, too.

Friday, February 22, 2013
LINDA KOEHLER/TIMES NEWS Sisters Betty Ann Flyte and Rose Reese love to talk about their encounter with angels and the miracle of Betty Ann's healing in Medjugorje.

Do you believe you can be touched by an angel?

Two sisters in Jim Thorpe do.

Betty Ann Flyte, 71, and Rose Reese, 60, believe they have been touched by angels many times in their lives. But one angel, a living woman named Susan Reynolds, touched their lives in such a way, that it led to making a pilgrimage to Europe in search of a miracle.

And they found it.

Friday, February 22, 2013
LINDA KOEHLER/TIMES NEWS Susan Reynolds talks about her book, titled "The Angel Lady: A Journey with My Spiritual Companions" at a recent book signing at Our Lady Queen of Peace in Brodheadsville. Jim Thorpe sisters Betty Ann Flyte and Rose Reese were part of a panel there who spoke about their angel experience which is included in Reynolds' book.

Susan Reynolds, known to many in the Stroudsburg area as "The Angel Lady" and founder of the non-profit, 501c3 organization, the Follow Me Foundation, providing food, clothing and counseling to those in need in the community, wrote a book titled, "The Angel Lady: A Journey with My Spiritual Companions."

Friday, February 15, 2013
DONALD R. SERFASS/TIMES NEWS Dale Freudenberger, left, Tamaqua, and Bill Harleman, Hometown, set up the Tamaqua Historical Society display at the Schuylkill County History Fair held Saturday at Fairlane Village Mall, Norwegian Township.

For the tenth year, historical groups from all corners of Schuylkill County gathered to show off a small portion of their collections.

The 10th Annual Schuylkill County History Fair took place Saturday, February 10, at Fairlane Village Mall, Route 61, Norwegian Township. The event was held on the second day of winter storm Nemo, but the show went on as planned.

Representatives of twelve historical societies out of 16 registered drove over snow-covered roads in order to showcase some of their intriguing items. Four groups canceled due to the weather.

Friday, February 8, 2013

Albinism is a genetic condition where people are born without the usual pigment in their bodies.

Their bodies aren't able to make a normal amount of melanin, the chemical responsible for eye, skin, and hair color. So most people with albinism have very pale skin, hair, and eyes. Albinism can affect people of all races, and there are different kinds of albinism.

Friday, February 8, 2013
The Rev. Mindy Heppe navigates the sidewalks of Shenandoah aided by her white cane.

The Reverend Mindy Heppe was born different from the rest of the population.

She stands out in a crowd simply by being there.

But what makes her special is the same unique quality that gives her special vision

Heppe is albino.

And she doesn't mind being different. For her, it's not a big deal.

In fact, she considers it simply one of many different characteristics of her general make up, the same as everyone else.

"At some point you realize that everybody is different," says the Shenandoah woman.

Friday, February 1, 2013
"Turquoise Tenerife" off loom weave with fiber and stone embellishment by Claudia Hill.

Take an object...any object. Give it to an artist or craftsman and they will transform it into a work of art.

Gourds have become blank slates for some artists, like Susan Pekala of Kunkletown and Claudia Hill of Saylorsburg.

They recently had a showing of their gourd-tastic art at the Monroe County Conservation District Center in Stroudsburg. It was gourds of all shapes and sizes. Gourds cut and carved. Gourds painted and decorated. It was a treasure trove of their creativity.

Many of their gourds that were showcased had a Native American theme.

Friday, January 25, 2013
DONALD R. SERFASS/TIMES NEWS Among the restoration team, from left: Joe Kielbasa, Dave Shott, the Rev. Boguslaw Janiec, Trish Kroh and Bob Kroh.

Many sets of hands are busy at work inside a McAdoo church.

With loving care, they manipulate precious crystal prisms, crystal beads and delicate wire fasteners. They experiment with pipe cleaners and liquids and polishing techniques.

But don't be mistaken, their every move is precise and exacting. They tenderly brush gold filigree and line up rows of paper cups to organize prisms and beads removed one-by-one from gradient strands. Some large. Some tiny. Each diameter measured to the millimeter using a caliper.

Friday, January 18, 2013
DONALD R. SERFASS/TIMES NEWS Harry Miller, president, Summit Hill Historical Society, points out a framed image in the town's borough building that depicts extensive workings geared toward extinguishing an underground fire at what was called the "$3,000,000 Burning Mine."

Archival files at the No. 9 Mine and Museum in Lansford contain an 1884 newspaper story about a deep mine fire in Lansford that might have implications for the Burning Mine in Summit Hill.

The story, discovered by Dave Kuchta, president, Panther Creek Valley Foundation, casts light on what was an extensive 1850s mine fire in Lansford. After reading about it, Kuchta, feels certain that it continued to smolder and was the beginning of the "Infamous Summit Hill Burning Mine Fire" of 1859.

Friday, January 11, 2013
History enthusiast Dale Freudenberger, Tamaqua, sorts through his private collection of posters from Lakeside Park in preparation for a potential museum display in tribute to the legendary Barnesville site.

From ice-skating in the winter to picnicking in summer, Lakeside Park was a year-round get-away to forget your troubles.

It was the workingman's park, attracting coal miners and their families from places like Lansford, Tamaqua, Shenandoah, Coaldale and Mahanoy City.

And although it was later eclipsed by the larger, star-studded Lakewood Park a mile away, Lakeside never gave up its hold as an entertainment venue. But its complete history was never fully documented.