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Friday Feature

Friday, August 9, 2013

Norman Burger, chairman of the Chestnuthill Township's 250th anniversary committee, said since the tea was presented by the Chestnuthill Township Historical Society, he was providing some of the history.

Pennsylvania was begun when William Penn received land given to his father in payment of a debt owed by the king. Penn made a treaty with the Lenape Indians for the land that was to become the three counties of Bucks, Philadelphia and Montgomery. Missionaries visited the area north of the Blue Mountain.

Friday, August 2, 2013
DONALD R. SERFASS/TIMES NEWS Without saying a word, Kyle Hacker looks directly into your eyes and invites you into his world.

Kyle Hacker silently reaches out and holds your hand.

Or he'll approach and take your arm and look into your eyes. Maybe he'll squeeze your finger.

In a moment, he'll smile.

All of it is non-verbal, but it's his way of saying hello.

Even more, it's his way of getting to know you.

If you're perceptive, you'll understand that he's inviting you into his world.

He wants you to join him and to share in what he has to offer.

And what he has to offer is unconditional love.

Friday, July 26, 2013
Hours after his birth in 2010, Bobby Edmonds of MaryD wears a Cool Cap in the NICU at the Janet Weis Children's Hospital at Geisinger Medical Center, Danville. The specialized pediatric device uses cool water to prevent swelling of the brain in an effort to prevent possible brain damage.

It's been a hectic day, but before you can go home and relax, there's one more stop to make picking up something for dinner. As you approach the cashier, your mind is buzzing with hundreds of little details. Did I lock the office door? Did I turn out the lights? How long is this going to take? What else do I have to do tonight?

Friday, July 19, 2013
ELSA KERSCHNER/TIMES NEWS Stephanie Karmonick rides Frosty as he is led by Amanda Carnes. The sidewalkers are Greg Stewart and Samantha Dale.

Janie Miller, a volunteer coordinator at Horses and Horizons, New Ringgold, said Elaine and Harvey Smith celebrated the 20th anniversary of the farm on Zion's Stone Church Road on June 9. An open house was held from 5 to 6 p.m. Private riding lessons are offered and at 6 p.m. A group lesson is held. At the open house a mother said riding had helped loosen her daughter's muscles and she is better at keeping focused.

A new arena has been built so classes do not have to be cancelled if there is rain. The arena building also has a classroom.

Friday, July 12, 2013
DONALD R. SERFASS/TIMES NEWS Bob Perrin has assembled artifacts and created a showcase display to start what will become the Coaldale Historical Society.

In one unexpected moment, Bob Perrin's direction in life changed.

Incredibly, it happened as he took a bite of pizza.

No, it wasn't a conscious decision; instead, it was a startling medical crisis that took place over Christmas vacation.

"It was December 23, 2003, and I was in Frackville Mall eating pizza when it happened," says the Coaldale resident.

Within a split second, Perrin's eyes rolled back in his head and he lost awareness.

At that point, Perrin, now 48, had suffered a midbrain aneurysm.

Friday, July 5, 2013

Editor's note: This is the first in an ongoing series of individual stories devoted to 'Our Miracle Kids,' children in the TIMES NEWS coverage area who, for one reason or another, are faced with unusual obstacles to their health, well-being, and, at times, their very survival. We invite you to look into the lives of these special youngsters and the remarkable circumstances faced by them and their families as together they assemble building blocks of happiness despite obstacles that challenge the imagination.

Friday, July 5, 2013
Stephen Behun (glasses) races with his younger siblings, Will and Katie, despite what some would consider a handicap - a three chambered heart.

Okay, he turns blue once in a while, but that doesn't stop seven year old Stephen Behun of Tamaqua from doing anything and everything every other boy his age does.

Climbing trees, playing tag, wrestling, swimming, karate and fighting space aliens are just a few of the pastimes of this dynamo. Sounds like your everyday, average first grader, but Stephen is just a teeny bit different. He does it with a three chambered heart, instead of the four chambers like his friends' hearts.

Friday, June 28, 2013
TN PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/DONALD R. SERFASS On June 28, 1963, nobody seemed to notice when the final commuter train left Tamaqua for good, a scene recreated in this photo illustration.

The final whistle blew just after 9 a.m.

The day was June 28, 1963.

It was a Friday morning, exactly 50 years ago today. A lone, wailing whistle signaled the end to a way of life.

Eight passengers rode on the final excursion out of Tamaqua.

After 131 years of rail industry, it was the end of an era. A turning point in history. Tamaqua would be forever changed.

But, at the time, nobody noticed.

Friday, June 21, 2013
Nick Kershner throws darts made from corn cobs at a hoop.

It was the third year that excited students from Willow Lane School, Macungie, came to Ontelaunee Park, Lynn Township, to learn about Indian culture on the day before the annual powwow, May 17.

Teachers accompanying the kids were Lisa Van Ormer, Lori Merrill, Matt Weimann and Joe Bigley.

The cultural displays were set up in the old pavilion and every 10 minutes students changed stations.

Friday, June 14, 2013
LINDA KOEHLER/TIMES NEWS The Palmerton Area Heritage Center's latest display features over 150 hats worn by men and women from the 1800s-1900s. The hats are on loan for the display like this collection of hats from the '40s, 50s and 60s, ranging from a stylish swimming cap, far left, to the pink pillbox, center, that belonged to Helen Halmi and the orange straw hat, right, was worn by Helen Snyder, a teacher at Delaware School.

Hold on to your hats. A great display has come to Palmerton. Come hang your hat at the Palmerton Area Heritage Center and take a walk down Memory Lane and see a delightful hat display.

In the "olden days," a woman would never have left the house without wearing a hat. A man always wore a hat, whether it was a straw bowler, a derby, top hat or cap.

But for some women today, we only remember wearing dressy hats to church and weddings when we were younger. Men wore fedoras to work and straw hats to work outside. Baseball caps started becoming the norm.