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Friday Feature

Friday, September 24, 2010
The body takes shape as Harvey Beers continues the restoration.

Harvey Beers and his wife Janet are proud of their 1923 Chevrolet delivery van which has won a roomful of trophies. The body had been built by Martin and Parry Carriage Company, York, for Chevrolet.

The reason for the excessive pride is that he rebuilt the body "from the engine back" with just a pile of boards, many of which were rotted into powder. The few decent ones that remained were enough to give him measurements to create templates to restore the body.

Friday, September 17, 2010
Bridgette Devney waits at the gate on Sassy for class 8, English walk-trot pleasure 13-18 year olds.

Appaloosas and paints, chestnuts and bays - a variety of colors filled the show grounds of the Getz Farm in Albrightsville on September 5.

Charles and Carol Getz host two shows every year and this one was to benefit Special Olympics.

It was cool and breezy, which beats hot weather any day for a horseshow, and cool and breezy is what the Special Olympics show had.

"The weather is perfect," said Penny Kleintop, who helped organize the show.

Friday, September 10, 2010
LINDA KOEHLER/TIMES NEWS Members of Salem-St. Paul's Lutheran Church, Kresgeville, youth group and their adult leaders and chaperones spent a week in Cherokee, North Carolina, as a part of TEAMeffort, an organization that helps people around the country fix up their homes. They are, standing left to right: Matthew Miller, Karinsue Miller, Katey Smith, Christian Harding, Ken Jablonski, Spencer Yeakel, Adam Jablonski, Brijanna Dunlap, Sally Jablonski and Kim Perry. Sitting, front, left to right: Brittney Gonzales, Katie Green, Taylor Miller, Tommy Tabzres, Jacob Miller and Ruby Dunlap. Kylene Slater was on the trip but not present for the picture.

On Karinsue Miller's first day of her weeklong vacation, she tore down walls, carried out garbage, hung Sheetrock and spackled.

Just another day in Paradise?

Well, it was for Karinsue because she watched young people grow in faith and understanding.

Miller, a confirmation teacher and youth group leader at Salem St. Paul's Lutheran Church of Kresgeville, and four other adults accompanied twelve of SSP's youth on a mission trip to Cherokee, North Carolina the week of July 10-17.

It was hard word, hotter than all get out, and one of the best week's of her life.

Friday, September 3, 2010
DONALD R. SERFASS/TIMES NEWS Paranormal researcher Tim Heckman of Tamaqua discusses oddities such as Bigfoot and Giganopithicus. Heckman travels extensively in search of answers to many of today's mysteries.

For Tim Heckman, life is all about finding answers. Not just any answers. The big answers.

Heckman, 40, has been devoting himself to researching all things unusual.

His avocation has taken him to 25 states, including thousands of miles of travel this year alone.

Friday, August 27, 2010
ELSA KERSCHNER/TIMES NEWS Kathy Augustine displays samples of items she has dyed.

When introducing Kathy Augustine at the July 29 program at the Kibler School, Towamensing Township, Kay Gilbert, president of Friends of Kibler, said Augustine had been there before to make a presentation. That time it was a program about spinning. Her mother-in-law, Connie Bieling, said Augustine spun wool to have something to dye.

"Tonight is all about color," said Augustine. "Color is defined by how the brain responds to light. Everyone perceives color in a slightly different way."

It was Sir Isaac Newton who saw how a prism broke color into the rainbow colors.

Friday, August 20, 2010
LINDA KOEHLER/TIMES NEWS Pam Hubbard of Astolat Farm in Effort, welcomes visitors to her English Cottage Garden, broken up into several smaller gardens. She is ready to enter the Shade Garden.

As an elementary school principal, Pamela Hubbard, of Effort, knew that when she retired, she wanted a less stressful existence. She imagined spending her golden days tending an English cottage garden, just like her grandmother's and the ones she grew up with in her native country of England.

Some dreams do come true because that's just what she has been doing for the last five years.

"I retired to garden," says Pam, with a gentle English accent.

Friday, August 13, 2010
LINDA KOEHLER/TIMES NEWS The new Monroe County Control Center is located on the second story of the Monroe County Public Safety Center building at 100 Gypsum Rd., Suite 2 in Snydersville, just off Rt. 33, across from the Monroe County Correctional Facility.

The Monroe County Control Center is located in Snydersville, just off Rt. 33, across from the Monroe County Correctional Facility. Gary Hoffman, director of communications at the Control Center, started out as a dispatcher in 1978.

"We had three radio channels. Now we have over 40. We had one tower site and now we have 11. As the county grew, the Control Center grew," he says.

The Control Center receives about two million transactions (calls) a year.

The following timeline that shows the history of the Monroe County Control Center:

Friday, August 13, 2010
Gary Hoffman, Director of Communications for the Monroe County Control Center, displays the choices that the townships will have for the new addressing which will begin on Aug. 13 of this year.

David Koerner, a dispatcher, sits at his desk with five computer monitors in front of him at the Monroe County Control Center. A call comes in from a husband whose wife is in labor. They are en route to the hospital. He doesn't think they're going to make it.

Koerner advises the distraught man where to pull off the road safely and dispatches an ambulance to the location.

Friday, August 6, 2010
"It was like a thud hitting me," explains Dan Reigel as he recovers at his home. The Tamaqua plumber survived a cave-in June 28 that buried him beneath nine feet of dirt.

Dan Reigel bends down low in order to position a reciprocating saw. He's working deep below ground level between walls of earth nine feet high.

The 49-year-old plumber is inside an excavation in the front yard of a private residence on Lombard Street in Tamaqua, a serene neighborhood of 1960s-era bi-levels.

Reigel stoops low to cut off another piece of pipe in preparation for a new sewer line.

Friday, July 30, 2010
LINDA KOEHLER/TIMES NEWS (PLEASE USE THIS BARN AS THE LEAD PICTURE WITH THE POEM UNDERNEATH IT) The Shafer/Howerter/Hartman barn, located along Mountain View Road, has long been neglected and falling into disrepair. But it is a reminder of a farm that once flourished and provided sustenance to the families who owned it. It is a sign of the times with farms disappearing across our nation's landscape.

Roy Christman of Towamensing said he heard a statement that America loses one barn a day.

With that thought in mind, two members of the Polk Township Historical Society, Norman Burger, president, and Elmer Heissam decided they were going to record as many barns in Polk Township as they could. To date, they have documented 33 standing barns and 47 that no longer exist. At one time there were estimated to be over 80 barns in the township. With their search came knowledge about some of the history of the area.