Saturday, March 25, 2017
     

Friday Feature

Friday, April 13, 2012
Scott D. Herring

Six men spanning five generations and 150 years:

George M. Bretz (1842-1895) Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, 1870s-1880s

William H. Rau (1855-1920) Lehigh Valley RR and Pennsylvania Railroad, 1890s

John Horgan, Jr. (1859-1926) Delaware & Hudson Railway, 1905-1926

Watson Bunnell (1871-1950) Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, 1905-1919

George Harvan (1921-2002) Lehigh Coal & Navigation Co. / Lanscoal 1949-1972

Scott D. Herring (1960-present) Independent, 1973-onward

Friday, April 13, 2012
In October, 1995, Herring captured this image of the breaker at Delaware & Hudson Railway's Hudson Coal Company Colliery, Larksville, near Kingston, Pa.

Scott Herring is an artist behind a lens. He's not looking to simply take a picture.

Instead, Herring is using photos to tell the story of our region.

For the past forty years, the Tamaqua native has used two gifts - the technical capability of a camera and his limitless ingenuity - to paint a timeless mural of a rich culture and a disappearing landscape.

The end result is The Hardcoal Chronicles Fortieth Anniversary, a canvas that captures the life and times of the anthracite coal fields and the essence of the hardworking people who built America.

Friday, April 6, 2012
Large bas-relief sculptures in the Chapel of Lithuanian Martyrs at St. Peter's Basilica, Rome, are a match to ones found at Tamaqua's SS. Peter and Paul Church. The sculptures were created by the same world-class artist.

Sometimes we journey far away and learn more about our own backyard.

Such was the case recently when four Tamaqua friends traveled 4,400 miles to Rome, Italy, and made a surprising discovery about their church back home.

It happened unexpectedly and left the visitors dumbstruck.

For Bill Savage, it began with a special feeling.

Friday, March 30, 2012

Some interesting trivia that Michelle McLaughlin shares about quilts are:

*Years ago, it was a practice for the mistress of a Pennsylvania Dutch home to put out her best quilts on Sundays because she knew company was coming.

*If a woman could not read or write, she could at least sew and quilt. Women used quilts as a way to express themselves, historically, and giving her point of view.

*Quilts express a woman's voice of her time, her political views and national beliefs. There was a rose pattern that was known as a Democrat rose and one as the Whig rose.

Friday, March 30, 2012
LINDA KOEHLER/TIMES NEWS At a Palmerton Concourse Club meeting, Michelle McLaughlin displays a Centennial quilt from her husband's family, dating it to 1876, determined by the fabric that has the dates 1776-1876 printed on it.

"I'm passionate about antique quilts," says Michele McLaughlin of Emmaus.

A quiltmaker for over 30 years, she has become an avid collector of antique and vintage quilts. She thinks she probably has over 100.

"I began collecting when people started giving me old quilts. I feel responsible for them, so I've become their caretaker."

To Michelle, there is a mystique about quilts.

"They speak to people. I don't know if it's the energy the women use when they put them together or if it's the passion we historians and collectors have for them. It just seems fortuitous."

Friday, March 23, 2012
ELSA KERSCHNER/TIMES NEWS Lori Carnes as Juliette Low told the story of the founding of Girl Scouts.

Juliette Gordon Low, portrayed by Lori Carnes, visited the Girl Scouts celebrating the anniversary of Girl Scouting in the United States.

She said she was born in 1860 at Savannah, Ga., and was nicknamed Daisy because she had the same name as her grandmother. The southern states began to secede from the union so the family moved to Chicago where people didn't like them because they were southerners.

Friday, March 23, 2012
Uniforms displayed are a Cadette/Senior Scout uniform from 1980, Senior Wing Scout from 1960, Senior Girl Scout from 1948, and a Mariner Girl Scout uniform from 1934,

Many troops of Girl Scouts congregated at the Liberty Museum in the basement of Zion Reformed UCC Church, Allentown, at 622 Hamilton St. The event was the kick-off of a year-long 100th anniversary celebration.

A program was held earlier this month and a scout exhibit will be on display until May 5.

As people look at the exhibit one leader is heard to say, "See the World Friendship Pin. It has changed." Many other things have changed over the years and long-time scouts who became leaders told about their time with the troops.

Friday, March 16, 2012
DONALD R. SERFASS/TIMES NEWS Rev. Richard E. Wilcock

When it comes to the common faith of spiritual human beings, sometimes the best approach is to try and understand all that we have in common.

In that regard, a New York City-based organization that melds Judaism with evangelical Christian faith to help further the understanding of the Jewish context of the gospel of Jesus will stage special presentations in Schuylkill and Carbon counties in the coming days.

Friday, March 16, 2012

According to its website, Chosen People Ministries exists "to pray for, evangelize, disciple, and serve Jewish people everywhere and to help fellow believers do the same."

The mission was founded in Brooklyn, New York in 1894 by Rabbi Leopold Cohn, a Hungarian Jewish immigrant with a zeal to share the knowledge of Yeshua (Jesus) the Messiah with God's chosen people.

Friday, March 9, 2012
The Curtain Call Players' 1975 cast of 'Deadwood Dick.' The Panther Valley theater troupe staged large, madcap productions.

Curtain up! Light the lights! They had nothing to hit but the heights!

Nearly 40 years ago, a fun-loving, fast-moving theater troupe took control of local stages and dazzled audiences with music, song and laughter.

The Panther Valley-based Curtain Call Players was a collection of avant-garde personalities who lived the arts and weren't afraid to take chances. Their shows emphasized wild theatrics complemented by a backdrop of laughs. That's because members decided early on that their mission would be a journey of fun.