Saturday, April 25, 2015
     

Under My Hat

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Sitting in the booth and waiting for a waitress, I couldn't help overhearing a conversation between two senior citizens enjoying coffee at the counter of a small, local diner.

They were reminiscing about grade school days.

"It was a rough time," said one old man, a gent with a loud, crackling voice, his furrowed brow emphasizing the word rough.

"My mom didn't have much, but always scraped things together. She had to pack my school lunch by seeing what she could come up with," the man recalled.

"But one thing I always had was bread," he went on.

Saturday, April 4, 2015
Thirty years ago I had a chance to spend a day one-on-one with Jack LaLanne, America's first fitness guru, and pick his brain about tips for healthy living.

It was exactly 30 years ago. But I'll never forget.

I was working in Wilkes-Barre and was given a chance to spend a day with fitness guru Jack LaLanne.

Younger folks might not recognize that name. But we boomers grew up watching him on television.

His real name was Francois Henri LaLanne and he was called the godfather of fitness.

He was the first fitness superhero, a pioneer in healthy lifestyles who opened the first fitness club in America.

Our day began early when I met him for a breakfast interview at a brookside table at the Woodlands Inn and Resort.

Saturday, March 21, 2015

I watched as young kids tossed something into the street.

I couldn't see what it was because they were walking a half block ahead of me. But I was certain I saw them throw something with disrespect.

When I'd reached the intersection, I looked down and scanned the area. I spotted it right away. Pennies. They had tossed a fistful of pennies into the gutter, as if the coins were worthless. It's happening more and more. I'm sure you've noticed it. Pennies are everywhere. Kids are discarding copper cents, and that's why the rest of us are finding so many "lost" pennies.

Saturday, March 7, 2015

It's hard not to notice the "For Sale" signs on former church buildings these days.

They're everywhere.

Churches of all denominations are on the auction block.

It's happening in Pennsylvania and across the country.

It's not necessarily a humorous topic, but one sale generated chuckles.

In Florida, the Full Deliverance Church of Jesus posted a sign that indicated: For Sale by Owner.

Local residents picked up on the wording, saying "Jesus is selling a church."

The sale of so many former church buildings makes me pause and reflect.

Saturday, February 21, 2015

Someone mentioned the other day that we're fortunate to have good police protection in our communities.

It's true. We have some very good police.

Still, I sometimes think they're underappreciated.

Journalists see the great job they do on a frequent basis.

We see police at work at crash scenes, drug raids, arraignments and arrests. We see them when we pick up daily police logs. We interact with them quite a bit.

If you spend time with an on-duty cop, you'll gain renewed respect instantly. Police have one of the toughest jobs around.

Saturday, February 7, 2015
Thirty-five years ago this month during the Three Mile Island nuclear tragedy, I met Gov. Richard Thornburgh while working on statewide publicity related to health care issues. Afterward, I traveled to Canada to study their system of national health insurance, an issue being addressed today in the U.S.

National health insurance, for some, is a dream come true.

Many baby boomers, for instance, are using the Affordable Care Act to find their way to early retirement.

After federal subsidies for those who qualify, the monthly cost might be $100 to $300 a month, as opposed to $700 or more.

It's making a difference for some workers in their late 50s and early 60s who want to retire early, the pre-Medicare years.

Still, I think ACA provisions are too intrusive and far-reaching and hopefully will be toned down.

Saturday, January 24, 2015
Linda Koehler

Sometimes I think retirement should be illegal.

It forces us say goodbye to people who've become family to us.

Like everyone else, I've grown to know Linda Koehler through her interesting news stories, fascinating features and hilarious columns.

Oh, those columns!

If anyone knows how to entertain in a way that touches the heart, it's Linda.

She's the Erma Bombeck of the Times News.

And that's important because daily news is often dismal and heavy. Writers like Linda know how to make us laugh, and they're precious for doing so.

Saturday, December 27, 2014

When the end of the year arrives, it's natural for us to pause and take stock in the previous 12 months.

Well, I did just that, and from what I saw, the end of 2014 can't come soon enough.

For me, the past year has been one of the most difficult times in terms of tragedy and sorrow.

I lost lifelong friends and classmates Tom Shea and Bonnie Schuetrumpf.

We first met at school, where we were thrown together by the alphabet, last names starting with sc, se and sh. But we quickly became close friends.

At times, the Three Musketeers.

Saturday, December 13, 2014
Hess's Inc. knew how to create illusion and it was fun being part of it, such as this Star Wars advertising image from Christmas, 1977, when I was in my 20s. I left the following year. The store was sold one year later.

Some of my most magical Christmas moments took place years ago at my first job at Hess's of Allentown.

If you shopped beneath those grand crystal chandeliers at 9th and Hamilton, you know how special Hess's was. Magic and glamour. Fashion models. Strawberry pie.

It also was a place of mystery, a series of buildings five stories high, joined together to appear as one, with secret halls leading to areas designated as "Co-Worker Only."

I was hired in Hess's advertising/public relations department in the 1970s and spent several years learning the business.

Saturday, November 29, 2014

One of best parts of journalism is the opportunity to meet people and write their stories.

In my opinion, you just can't beat it.

Telling other people's stories provides an opportunity to see new faces every day, broaden your horizons and, best of all, make new friends.

I had the chance Tuesday night to spend time with historian Bernie Krebs, along with wife Jane and her dad, Gary Solt, all of Jim Thorpe. Wonderful people.

Bernie grew up on West Broadway and is impassioned about old tales of Carbon County.