Saturday, November 22, 2014
     

Early Times Capsule

Saturday, October 22, 2011

By jim zbick

jzbick@tnonline.com

A well-known insurance company's commercial shows two parents explaining how they are investing in their financial future by teaching their 5-year-old how to dunk a basketball in hopes the child can some day land a college scholarship. The advertisement ends with the company stating that there is an easier way to save – by buying their insurance.

Saturday, October 15, 2011

On land it was the automobile and in the air it was the airplane. By 1911, the way Americans moved around was experiencing rapid change.

On Oct. 20, 1911, the Tamaqua Courier carried a small article that showed how change to a more mobile society was replacing one rugged animal that had provided years of service in helping move our local economy – the mule. Whether it was moving coal from the mines or helping transport it to markets, the dependable mule answered the call.

Saturday, October 8, 2011

America's crumbling infrastructure – including bridges, roads, rail lines, waste treatment facilities and dams – has become one of the issues heading into next year's presidential race.

A century ago, it was human error – the faulty construction of a reservoir in Potter County – that was blamed for a tragedy that wiped out the town of Austin, killing 78 people.

Saturday, September 24, 2011

By jim zbick

jzbick@tnonline.com

On Sept. 12, 1911, the Tamaqua Courier ran a front page story on how the coal regions had become a fertile area for boxing talent. The article, titled "Coal Regions a Boxing Nursery," was written by William H. Rocap, a fighter himself who decided to become a writer instead for the Philadelphia Ledger.

Saturday, September 17, 2011

THE DOG DAYS OF LATE SUMMER PRODUCED SOME BIZARRE CRIMES IN THE REGION IN 1911. IN DESCRIBING ONE SHOOTING INCIDENT IN MOUNT CARMEL, A REPORTER FROM THE TAMAQUA COURIER DESCRIBED THE SCENE AS SOMETHING REMINISCENT OF THE WILD WEST IN ITS "WOOLIEST DAYS."

Saturday, September 10, 2011

The drastic weather we've seen in many parts of the nation this year has some newscasters and weather officials using terms like "once-in-a-lifetime" and "never-before-seen." A century ago, the region found itself in the grips of a late-summer drought that didn't break until a deluge in late August brought relief and replenished water supplies.

Saturday, September 3, 2011

By JIM ZBICK

jzbick@tnonline.com

There's little argument that workers a century ago didn't earn the right or have good reason to celebrate Labor Day.

In a report to the senate on labor conditions at 344 iron and steel plants in the United States, Commerce and Labor Secretary Charles Nagel pointed out that a sampling of 90,000 employees found that one-third of them were working seven-day workweeks. A quarter of them were working 84 or more hours a week, which meant 12-hour workdays all week, including Sundays.

Saturday, August 27, 2011

By JIM ZBICK

jzbick@tnonline.com

Shortly before noon on Aug. 25, 1911, two rail cars connected to a Lehigh Valley Railroad's train derailed near a bridge in Manchester, N.Y., about 16 miles from Geneva, causing what one reporter called "one of the worst wrecks in the history of the state."

Train No. 4 was running 40 minutes behind schedule when it sped past the Geneva station. Among the passengers was a large number of Civil War veterans and their families returning from the national GAR encampment held in Rochester.

Saturday, August 20, 2011

With the automobile chugging through the countryside and the streets of downtown America, and air travel beginning to take flight, we were fast becoming a more mobile society in 1911.

These vast changes influenced every segment of society including fashion. The hobble skirt, which was cut so narrow at the ankles that it hindered walking, was the brainchild of French clothing designer Paul Poiret. Because they were so narrow at the hem, it "hobbled" the wearer, thus the name.