Tuesday, July 22, 2014
     

The Healthy Geezer

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Q. Do we lose our sense of taste as we get older?

In general, sensitivity to taste gradually decreases with age. But there are some whose taste isn't affected by getting older.

The ability to taste food and beverages means a lot to seniors. Let's face it; we lose a lot of the pleasures of our youth, but eating well isn't usually one of them.

Taste also has a major impact upon our physical and mental health. Our sense of taste is especially important if we have to stay on a diet.

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Q. What is the value of taking hormones for menopause?

To help control menopause symptoms, there is Hormone Therapy (HT) or Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT).

The most comprehensive evidence about taking hormones after menopause comes from the Women's Health Initiative Hormone Program sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the National Cancer Institute.

The WHI Hormone Program involved two studies the use of estrogen plus progestin (a synthetic progesterone), and the use of estrogen alone.

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

Q. I've been very hungry recently. Someone told me that this is a symptom for diabetes. Is that true?

An intense hunger is one diabetes symptom. Here are others: frequent urination, strong thirst, fatigue, unintended weight loss, slow-healing sores, dry and itchy skin, numbness or tingling in your feet, and blurred vision. However, some people with diabetes do not have symptoms.

Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases characterized by high levels of blood sugar. Diabetes can create serious health problems, but diabetics can control the disease.

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Q. What bacteria causes athlete's foot?

Athlete's foot is not caused by bacteria. It is caused by tinea, a fungus that also can give you jock itch and ringworm. You can catch it from another person, from animals or wet surfaces such as the floors of public showers.

Athlete's foot symptoms include dry skin, itching, burning, scaling, inflammation, and blisters. If blisters break, tissue becomes exposed and this can be painful.

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Q. Are all blood thinners the same?

Blood thinners reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke by reducing the formation of blood clots in your arteries and veins.

There are two main categories of blood thinners: antiplatelets and anticoagulants.

Antiplatelets prevent blood cells called platelets from forming a clot. Anticoagulants affect your body chemistry and lengthen the time it takes to form a blood clot.

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Q. I'm a 73-year-old woman. How much calcium do I need?

Women who are older than 50 should be consuming 1,200 milligrams of calcium a day. Older women need plenty of calcium to prevent osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis, or porous bone, is a disease characterized by low bone mass and deterioration of bone tissue. Osteoporosis leads to an increase risk of bone fractures typically in the wrist, hip, and spine. One in two women and one in four men over the age of 50 will break a bone because of osteoporosis.

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

Q. Why do they call high blood pressure the silent killer?

High blood pressure known as hypertension is very sneaky. It's called the silent killer, because it usually has no symptoms.

Doctors say you have high blood pressure if you have a reading of 140/90 or higher. A blood pressure reading of 120/80 or lower is considered normal. Prehypertension is blood pressure between 120 and 139 for the top number, or between 80 and 89 for the bottom number.

Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Q. What is St. John's Wort?

St. John's Wort also known as hypericum herb, klamath weed or goat weed is a plant with yellow flowers that are used to make teas and tablets. For centuries, the plant has been considered a remedy for mental problems, including depression and anxiety.

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Q. How many kinds of hepatitis are there?

Your liver helps your body digest food, store energy and remove poisons. Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver that makes it stop working efficiently.

Hepatitis is usually caused by a virus. There are five main hepatitis viruses types A, B, C, D and E. There are several other causes of hepatitis.

Some people who have hepatitis have no symptoms. Others may have loss of appetite, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, fever, muscle and joint pain, diarrhea, dark-colored urine, pale bowel movements, stomach pain, and jaundice.

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Q. Are nuts really good for your heart?

The Harvard Men's Health Watch reports that studies show healthy men, and those who have already suffered a heart attack, can reduce cardiovascular risk by eating nuts regularly.

Here are some facts about nuts:

Ÿ Fiber. All nuts contain fiber, which helps lower your cholesterol. Fiber also makes you feel full, so you eat less.

Ÿ Some nuts contain plant sterols, a substance that can help lower your cholesterol.

Ÿ Nuts contain mono- and polyunsaturated fats known to benefit the heart.