Tuesday, September 16, 2014
     

Columns

Tuesday, January 8, 2013

Q. I wear dentures now. Any pointers I should know about?

The following are some tips for eating with dentures:

Ÿ Don't bite with your front teeth or pull your food outward from your mouth.

Ÿ Chew food on both sides of your mouth simultaneously to stabilize your dentures.

Ÿ Cut food into small pieces.

Ÿ When you first eat with your dentures, you should avoid sticky foods, raw vegetables and hard-to-chew meats.

Ÿ It is more difficult to feel inside your mouth when you wear dentures, so be careful with hot foods and anything with small bones.

Monday, December 31, 2012

Q. What exactly is a floater that you see in your eye?

Floaters create images in your eye that look like specks, filaments, rings, dots, cobwebs or other shapes. Floaters are the most vivid when you are looking at the sky or a white surface such as a ceiling. They move as your eyes move and seem to dart away when you try to look at them directly.

Some biology first.

Wednesday, December 26, 2012

This is the fourth and last column in a series about vision correction.

There are three basic ways to correct faulty vision: eyeglasses, contact lenses or surgery. In this column, we'll cover surgery.

Surgery is used to correct a variety of eye disorders. Of special interest to seniors is surgery for cataracts, so we'll start there.

A cataract is a clouding of the lens, the clear part of the eye that helps focus images like the lens in a camera. Cataracts can blur images and discolor them.

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

This is the third column in a series about vision correction.

There are three basic ways to correct faulty vision: eyeglasses, contact lenses or surgery. In this column, I'll cover contacts.

There are two basic kinds of contact lenses soft and hard.

Soft lenses, which are thin and gel-like, are the most popular of the two types of contacts. They come in many varieties and they are very comfortable. I never felt them in my eyes. The following are some choices in soft lenses:

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

(This is the second column in a series about vision correction.)

There are three basic ways to correct faulty vision: eyeglasses, contact lenses or surgery. In this column, we'll cover eyeglasses.

Eyeglasses correct the following vision problems:

Nearsightedness (myopia), which blurs distant objects.

Farsightedness (hyperopia), which blurs near vision.

Astigmatism is caused by an uneven curvature of the eye's surface that produces abnormal focus.

Presbyopia is a natural condition of aging that makes it more difficult to focus on near objects.

Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Q. How much water should I drink every day?

First, water intake is a health issue that you should discuss with your doctor before deciding how much you should drink. The amount you drink is dependent upon the state of your health.

The simplest answer I could find to this very complicated question is this: If you aren't thirsty and you produce one to two quarts of light yellow urine daily the average output for an adult you're probably taking in enough water.

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Q. My 40-year-old son was just diagnosed with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. What can he expect from this as he gets older?

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) was identified in 1886 by three physicians: Jean-Martin Charcot (sharr-KOE) and Pierre Marie in France, and Howard Henry Tooth in England. CMT is also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN). CMT is a group of related conditions all caused by inherited mutations in genes.

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Q. Do feet get larger as you age?

Feet get bigger over decades of pounding. Some people over the age of 40 can gain half a shoe size every 10 years.

Feet flatten out because their supporting tendons and ligaments lose their elasticity. As the tendon along the length of the sole elongates, the arch lowers. Another reason feet enlarge is that the force of your weight thins the fat pads cushioning the bottom of the feet.

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Q. I heard there's this goop that you can get injected into your knee that can ease pain. True?

Yes. The goop is hyaluronan, a thick lubricant and shock absorber in joint fluid. Hyaluronan injections, also called viscosupplements, are given to people with osteoarthritis.

Viscosupplementation began in Japan and Italy in 1987, in Canada in 1992, in Europe in 1995 and in the United States in 1997.

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Q. What happens to you if you eat more than one apple a day?

I realize this question was meant to be humorous, but there is a serious answer. There is a three-apple-a-day diet, which I'll get to later. But, first, let's discuss a single apple a day.

We have to go back in time to Wales to find the origins of "An apple a day keeps the doctor away."

The earliest known record of the maxim is in an 1866 edition of Notes and Queries magazine:

A Pembrokeshire proverb. Eat an apple on going to bed, And you'll keep the doctor from earning his bread.