Friday, July 11, 2014
     

Movie Review

Thursday, November 1, 2012

Each decade, one and sometimes a handful of films is embraced by and-or define and seem to symbolize a generation of high school and college-age youth.

In the 1950s, of course, it was "Rebel Without A Cause" (1955).

The 1960's brings "The Graduate" (1967) to mind.

In the 1970s, there was "American Graffiti" (1973), "Saturday Night Fever" (1977), "Grease" (1978) and "Animal House" (1978).

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

"The Master" is one of those films that audiences and reviewers either love or hate.

Since I try not be a "hater," put me in the category of "strongly dislike" regarding "The Master."

My opinion has to do with "The Master" writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson, whose films are fascinating and confounding mish-mashes of big ideas, intriguing characters and performances connected by often incoherent storylines and punctuated by shock-value scenes.

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

"Argo, an action-thriller that boasts impressive acting and directing, is based on a true spy story, "The Canadian Caper."

"Argo," directed by and starring Ben Affleck, tells the story about the United States Central Intelligence Agency bankrolling a fictitious Hollywood movie production to rescue Americans from Iran during the 1979 - '81 hostage crisis when Islamic student militants stormed and took over the U.S. Embassy in Tehran, Iran.

CIA agent Tony Mendez (Affleck) poses as a Canadian movie producer to scout locations for "Argo," a science-fiction movie.

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Forget about the trouble with the chair.

There's no trouble with Clint Eastwood in "Trouble with the Curve."

Eastwood is as delightfully cantankerous as ever as an elderly baseball scout named Gus who still pours over stacks of newspapers rather than log onto the computerized "Moneyball" statistical analysis approach to assess high school, college and other Major League Baseball prospects.

Friday, September 28, 2012

"Lawless" is a brutal drama based on a true story said to have taken place during the Great Depression in 1931 in Franklin County, Va.

With the advent of Prohibition in 1920, following passage of the Volstead Act as the 18th Amendment in 1919, the making and drinking of alcoholic beverages was banned in the United States.

Monday, September 17, 2012

"Robot & Frank" is a cute comedy-drama that presents issues about growing old and health care for the elderly in a very entertaining way.

The film by movie producer turned first-time feature director, Jake Schreier, and TV writer-producer and first-time feature screenwriter, Christopher D. Ford, should garner an actor Oscar nomination for Frank Langella, previously nominated for his stunning portrayal of former President Richard Nixon in director Ron Howard's "Frost-Nixon" (2008).

Thursday, September 13, 2012

The envelope, please.

That's the plot device on which, ahem, rides "Premium Rush," one of late summer's most adrenaline-charged movies.

The title refers to the speed, priority or experience of a New York City bicycle-courier delivering a high-priority message.

Never mind the definition. This film is the fastest thing on reels. You'll grip the arm of your movie theater seat, the person next to you (best to know him or her first) or your reporter's notebook (as was my case).

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

"Safety Not Guaranteed" is a hybrid film. It's part indie film, part "mumble-core" and part science fiction.

The film, while it doesn't always work, is a charmer, mostly for its off-hand, casual and sometimes clunky screenplay, directing and acting.

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

The cleverly-titled "ParaNorman," the new animated feature film, takes a page from the screenplay of "The Sixth Sense" (1991) where a young boy sees ghosts.

You no doubt remember the line: "I see dead people"?

In "ParaNorman," there's doubt among family, middle school classmates and New England towns people about just what Norman sees. Most think he simply has a vivid imagination.

Norman persists, however, and soon, he's scared up seven accusers from the grave who had sent a young girl they believed to be a witch to her doom 300 years ago in 1712.

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

The film, "The Intouchables," is bracing, uplifting and a triumph of the human spirit.

Plus, it's darn funny.

Philippe (François Cluzet) is a very wealthy Paris widower who is a tetraplegic following an accident. Philippe hires Driss (Omar Sy), a very poor, street-smart Senegales to be his live-in primary care-giver.

Driss has a strong personality and commands respect.

Philippe likes that. He doesn't want pity.