Bridge Street in Weissport has turned into a speedway.

That's what Weissport Council members have noticed with traffic coming through the tiny community since the detour was put in place a month ago.

During the detour, traffic that might have used the Route 209 Thomas J. McCall Memorial Bridge to get to Lehighton, Mahoning Township and locations beyond, is forced to travel through Weissport.

"It's not PennDOT's fault," said council member Brenda Leiby. "It's the people who drive through the town."

Leiby said there were five incidents in front of her home this past month.

"I thought they hit my car this last time," she said.

Leiby said that people are back and forth changing lanes, resulting in sudden stops and a lot of debris flying.

"We've swept the street to clear the debris a couple of times," she said.

Leiby said that she plans to do off street parking from now on to protect her car from the impatient drivers.

"Gawkers," was another word used to describe another issue that is also linked to the bridge reconstruction.

"The gawkers are coming down Allen Street to see how far the bridge project is progressing and then when they hit the dead end they turn around and one of them sideswiped a resident's car," said Gene Kershner, council president.

Kershner said that he plans to discuss the Allen Street issue with bridge personnel to see if signs can be posted to keep people from using Allen Street during the detour.

Kershner said bridge workers told him the project is on schedule.

In another traffic issue, Kershner said speed limit signs near the playground are not enforceable and council should consider adopting an ordinance so that violators can be cited.

Kershner said that a child was walking from his mother's car in the area near the playground when he was nearly hit by a motorcycle that was driving too fast, and the driver had to lay the bike down.

"He wanted to start something with the mother when he noticed someone trying to get his license number," Kershner said. "Then he took off."

Council members also welcomed its newest treasurer, Andrea Davis.

Davis said that she needs to complete authorization at the bank and then she will be able to provide a treasurer's report for the next meeting.

In other business, Kershner said that borough workers will be trained to notice any odors and strange sightings to comply with the Environmental Protection Agency.

He also wanted to remind residents that they can help protect the integrity of the Lehigh River watershed by alerting the borough if they notice anything out of the ordinary.

"If someone sees someone doing an oil change and not containing the oil, they should tell someone," said Kershner.

"This is a major concern for downstream water quality," he said.

"There are people downstream who use the Lehigh River water for drinking purposes and the EPA wants us to help the Lehigh River water to get better. This is all about protecting the water downstream."

Anyone who sees or smells anything off color should contact the borough at 610-377-5606 or Kershner at 610-377-6218.