The local politicians are once more among us, and they're sounding the same old rhetoric that I'm particularly tired of hearing: namely, more money for aiding our educational system. I want to give you politicians some advice: Stop asking the state for money to fund this failing institution. State education is a big hole that money is shoveled into but can never be filled. In case you haven't seen by now, money will never make it get better. Why do all of you politicians mistakenly believe that our problems can be solved by throwing money at them? Even our president states that we can "spend our way out of debt." With all of our tax dollars that are wasted on education, we're still almost dead last. We already have the best education money can buy. Isn't that proof enough?

No, I think that your platform should be turned in favor of the problems of our struggling seniors. Take the burden of high property taxes off of their backs, instead, so that they can keep their homes and stay warm for the winter. Frankly, I think that state education stinks, and I vote that you say "to hell with state money"; it's our tax money anyway. Our children and grandchildren are getting a lousy education from inept teachers who call our kids stupid and lazy and bully them while they hang up banners in the hallways that hypocritically promote good conduct and good citizenship. As much as we're made to pay into this system, it's clear that the state couldn't care less about teaching our children well. State education takes creativity away from teachers; the very talent that made them teachers in the first place.

I think that the teachers and the administrators who faithfully stand behind them and don't uphold the rights of parents and students are given way too much money to educate our kids.

So please take the advice of this lowly citizen. Until we are satisfied with a change in education, and our schools work their way out of the complacent hole they've dug themselves into, turn off the money machine until our children are taught correctly. Let them be taught the basics of reading, writing and arithmetic by enthusiastic teachers who aren't fattened up in their pride and made lazy by overpaid wages along with the excess of administrative and union support. Most importantly, have teachers become role models of moral ideals; of dedication, respect and hard work.

So take my advice and you'll win by a landslide.

Faye Ruckhardt

Nesquehoning