At noon, Sept. 7, following the anniversary parade, the Main Stage at the West End Fairgrounds was taken over by officials, some of whom presented proclamations honoring the milestone.

Norman Burger, president of the committee, began with a request that people reflect on the life of David Fleetwood and the others who were hurt mentally or physically at Ross Township a month ago.

"He was a very generous person and showed a lot of humor. He will be sorely missed by those on the committee and in the community. I know he would want you to join us on working for a better community. May we have a moment of silence," said Burger. A memorial had been set up for him in the Everett Building.

Burger said it was a tribute to him that so many came out including some who worked with him at Pocono Raceway.

Ellen Kern, representing Sen. Pat Browne and Sen. David Argall talked of the rich history of Chestnuthill Township.

"It is blessed with civic leaders who helped it become what it is. Best wishes for future growth and prosperity," she said.

She presented a proclamation to Burger, who returned the favor by presenting a bag of memorabilia, which was also given to the other presenters.

John Moyer, chairman of the Monroe County Commissioners, recalled an auction in Snydersville where a post office box was for sale. A man from Arizona, a postcard collector, expected to buy it, but it went to the grandson of a former postmaster.

Commissioner Janet Weidensaul was interested in buying a church pew. Moyer said the items offered showed that everyone wanted a piece of history.

"West End people identify with being from here. The West End binds everyone together," he said. He had a brick, found next to his daughter's new house, from the Blue Ridge brickworks in Saylorsburg which operated from 1890 to 1911. He gave the brick to Burger. Moyer talked about the quality of the history book that the committee had put together which reaches back to the time of the Indians.

Commissioner Suzanne McCool thanked all the people from the four townships who worked so hard on the book and the day's events.

She gave a brief history: In 1763 people living north of the Blue Mountain petitioned to have their own township. Ross was split off in 1817 and was itself split to create Eldred Township in 1851, Polk was formed from Chestnuthill in 1846. She congratulated the citizens and historical societies for their effort. McCool brought a proclamation from the commissioners.

State Representatives Mario Scavello and Mike Carroll were present. Carroll said the weather was cooperating and it was a wonderful day at the fairgrounds.

Scavello said he knew it would be a great day with Dave Fleetwood up there looking down at us. He said the East End does not have the cohesiveness of the West End. He recalled bringing sports teams to play in the West End and usually getting whipped.

"We want to be here for the 350th," he said.

Chestnuthill supervisor Chuck Gould said the original Chestnut Hill had been subdivided but it has come full circle with the township involved with regional ventures.

"A month ago was one of the darkest days as a township supervisor. It is good to see everyone come together as a community," he said.

Burger introduced other supervisors from Polk, Eldred and Ross townships.

Butch Kresge from Ross gave him a memento for the cooperation that he had pulled together.

"It takes many hands to make work light," was a saying Burger's mother used frequently. He said he plans to help Ross get a historical society put together.