You can bet the president and his closest advisers within the administration are conscious of the dismal numbers surrounding The Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, the president's signature achievement that will make or break his legacy.

It doesn't take a genius to realize why the administration has been reluctant to release information on the number of Americans who have successfully enrolled in the Obamacare exchanges. The web site Healthcare.gov. has been plagued by problems since its opening on Oct. 1.

The media has gotten wise to the Obama administration's attempts to block the data on the web side disaster. Many journalists, like AP White House correspondent Julie Pace, sees through the deception. She says the administration is trying to be selectively transparent by feeding us numbers that make the system look good. What's frustrating to reporters is that they know that Obama officials have the real numbers.

"We'll see if the pressure starts to mount and if we get to a point where the administration feels they need to present use with more data before mid-November. You can assume, though, that the number is fairly low. If you have a half-million people who have gotten the application finished, that means the enrollment number is likely far less than that," Pace explained.

Here are some other numbers and statistics provided by the Congressional Budget Office which this non-transparent administration would like you to tune out:

Ÿ 20 million. The number of Americans projected to no longer have their current employer-based health coverage by 2019. Some predict it could be as high as 35 million.

Ÿ 85 million. The number that the Office of the Actuary estimates that Medicaid enrollment will increase to by the year 2020 (from 54 million in 2010), pushing America closer to government-run health care.

Ÿ $1 trillion. This is what the 18 new taxes or penalties imposed by Obamacare will total from 2013 to 2022. They will directly or indirectly impact families, including those earning below $250,000.

Ÿ $1.683 trillion. The amount Obamacare expects to spend between 2012 and 2022 on its coverage expansion provisions alone.

Ÿ 30 million. The numbers of Americans that will remain uninsured in 2021, despite Obamacare.

Ÿ $716 billion. The amount Obamacare takes out of Medicare to pay for non-Medicare coverage provisions.

Ÿ 15. The number of unelected officials comprising the Independent Payment Advisory Board under Obamacare that will be in charge of cutting Medicare payments for millions of seniors.

Ÿ 50.8 percent. The number of Americans who support the repeal of Obamacare, according to Real Clear Politics.

Here are some additional Obamacare numbers now plaguing the administration:

Ÿ It's estimated that less than three percent of American citizens visited the Obamacare web site and were able to actually create an account.

Ÿ Seventy-nine percent of small businesses saying Obamacare makes it harder to grow. Nearly one-quarter says they'll reduce hiring to ensure they never exceed 50 total employees, which would create new mandates and costs under the program.

Finally, there's the $4,000 which is the amount of increase Obamacare is expected to cost the average family of four by 2016 and that's not even counting Obamacare's $1 TRILLION in new taxes over the next decade.

When those numbers start affecting the pocket book, it will become increasingly difficult for supporters to put a positive spin on Obamacare.

By Jim Zbick

editor@tnonline.com